SodaStream takes their brand to the Super Bowl

SodaStream takes their brand to the Super Bowl

SodaStream | Henry Isaacs | New YorkWhat’s more valuable – an ad in the Super Bowl or the teaser ads FOR the ad in the Super Bowl? According to brand management firm Kontera, both are. Especially when it comes with Scarlett Johansson.

One of the biggest campaigns to date for an Israeli company, SodaStream’s campaign has already gotten a 700% boost in brand awareness. Could be the tasty carbonated product or could be the power of Scarlett Johansson. Either way, the Jewish audience has more than one reason to watch the Super Bowl next weekend!

Check out a Behind the Scenes video of the SodaStream commercial here:

 


Henry Isaacs Marketing | Isaac Hyman, Founder

 www.henryisaacs.net | info@henryisaacs.net | 646.833.8604


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Jewish Advertising 101 – What Hebrew National Didn’t Mean To Say

Jewish Advertising 101 – What Hebrew National Didn’t Mean To Say

 

Hebrew Nations - Kosher or Not Kosher?
Hebrew NationalWhat Hebrew National Didn’t Mean To Say

In no surprising news to the mainstream Jewish market, Hebrew National has been sued over allegations that they aren’t officially considered kosher but rather are non-kosher. I’m not going to explain the lawsuit – you can find all the details about it here – but rather its important to focus on what Hebrew National is generally telling the world, the Jewish market, and kosher customers each time it says “We answer to a higher authority.”

Hebrew National’s claim to adhering to the highest Kosher standards available is quite puzzling and inaccurate to those who reside within the Kosher world. The Jewish market recognizes numerous Kosher certifications around the world – there are more than 1100 global and local certifiers – including the Orthodox Union, OK, Kof K, Tablet K, Scroll K, CRC, and more. The OK and Orthodox Union kashrut certifications make up the two largest agencies, represented by their OU and OK symbols. If Hebrew National was looking to adhere to an internationally recognized and respected kosher certification that was synonymous with quality and strict standards, the logical choice would be either the OU or OK symbols. By not using the brand that is recognized by all Jewish affiliations across the board, Hebrew National is not merely alienating an entire group of Jewish customers, they’re also creating a vocal protest against their claim of being kosher. Doesn’t seem like an effective marketing strategy – target a non-Jewish non-Kosher market while frustrating the Jewish & Kosher market.

Hebrew National’s use of the word “kosher” is merely a play on similar popular themes such as “going green”, “all-natural”, and “healthy”. Kosher, like Halal in some ways, has always been viewed as a preferred and healthier alternative to regular foods. The rigourous inspection and cleaning process, the supervision by Rabbi’s, and the use of only certain animals for consumption are all foundations of true Kosher processing. The controversy isn’t arising out of the kosher, but rather who the supervising agency is – in this case, Triangle K & Associates.

In many Orthodox Jewish circles, using Triangle K branded products has been frowned upon for MEAT & POULTRY items. Although many Orthodox Jews won’t eat any Triangle K branded products, meat and poultry is the main problem area that is cited for why Orthodox Jews shun the symbol. Hebrew National is not GLATT KOSHER, which is a red flag for many Orthodox Jews who swear by glatt kosher for all meats. Rabbi Jason Miller has a great blog post on the case and on Glatt Kosher . Furthermore, many Hebrew National products are sold in high traffic areas such as baseball games and theme parks and, while Triangle K may indeed be supervising the meat in-house, there is zero supervision over the cooking process, which is an entirely different set of kosher requirements. Triangle K knows this and by not taking steps to advise the final buyer (such as double bagging in a microwave) shows a lack of initiative in allaying any negative perceptions about their symbol. (Bear in mind, we’re ignoring the claim that AER employees have claimed certain procedures are rendering the meat entirely NOT Kosher; this blog isn’t qualified to rule on that at all!)

Overall, Hebrew National (well, really ConAgra) doesn’t quite understand that the best market for a truly kosher product is the Jewish kosher market; the fact that they nearly avoid marketing the brand to them, while also ignoring their shouts for change, should indeed raise a red flag about how Kosher they really are. A marketing strategy that consists of promoting a Kosher product to a prospective non-Jewish, non-Kosher marketplace while alienating and frustrating the actual Jewish, Kosher market seems to be a recipe for disaster. In an age of social networking and word of mouth, Hebrew National should start by getting the Jewish, Kosher market on their side before promoting to a non-Kosher (and potentially non-interested) market.

The saga reminds me of the parable of why a pig isn’t kosher even though it has split hooves (an animal needs to chew it’s cud as well, meaning chewed a second time). It’s like the pig is saying to laymen, “Look, I have split hooves, I’m kosher, trust me!”; it takes a full understanding of kosher to know that above the surface and below the surface are two entirely different things. Until Hebrew National starts understanding that their claims can be misleading, all they’re saying is “Look, we have the symbol, we’re kosher!” Maybe that will be the new slogan.

If Hebrew National wants to ensure a solid core market that is both Kosher and interested in Kosher/healthy products, they should reach out to a more comprehensive base of Kosher & Jewish consumers to see how to improve their marketing and product.


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Marketing | Social Media | Public Relations | Event Planning | Brand Consulting

Jewish Social Media 101 – Social Media Outsourcing Increases 128%

Jewish Social Media 101 – Social Media Outsourcing Increases 128%

Social Media - In House or Outsource?It’s no surprise that hiring a full time social media employee increasingly seems to be a luxury a small business or non-profit can’t afford (see our past social media blog post here). Benefits and lack of comprehensive ROI measurements, you’re talking about $46,000 to $71,000 for a Social Media Specialist alone. How long will that compensation level last? That explains why outsourcing has risen 128% in only two years. It just makes sense to the bottom line, allows for greater flexibility (freelancers can tweet at 11:00 PM at night!), and free’s up some company cash to focus on mobile or social advertising, a smarter, more measurable investment. Read on to see the statistics and the pros/cons of outsourcing your social media.

Social Media Outsourcing Increases 128% in Two Years [New Report]

Posted by Corey Eridon

outsourcing social media

Social Media Examiner’s Michael Stelzner is releasing his 2012 State of the Social Media Marketing Industry report today after his 1:00 PM EST webinar with HubSpot’s Content Strategist Kipp Bodnar, where the two will review all the juicy data. Part of Michael’s research included asking social media marketers whether they’re outsourcing any of their social media marketing tasks, and if so, what specifically they’re outsourcing. Turns out, in 2010, only 14% of marketers outsourced social media marketing. Last year, that number doubled to 28%. And this year, the percentage rose yet again, with 32% of marketers outsourcing social media.

It’s not exactly “news” that marketers are strapped for time, so when budget allows, it can be a huge relief to outsource activities to reputable agencies or contractors. But if you’ve spent any time on Twitter, you’ve probably seen more than your share of social media “experts,” “gurus,” and “ninjas.” In other words, it’s really easy for a marketer to get sucked in by contractors or agencies that might not be qualified to manage their social media presence.

So let’s break down the activities social media marketers have decided to outsource, and examine the pros and cons for outsourcing the most popular activities that show up on the list. That way, if you do decide to outsource, you know what to look out for so you actually see ROI on your outsourced social media spend.

What Social Media Marketers are Outsourcing in 2012

So, what are social media marketers outsourcing? Let’s take a look at the research from the report!

social media tasks being outsourcedAn interesting point of data the report uncovered is that social media marketers with 3 or more years of experience are 23% more likely to outsource design and development tasks than beginners. And according to another report we recently released — the State of the Online Marketing Services Industry83% of agencies offer social media services, with 7% planning to add it in the future.

So are these outsourcing choices a good idea? What troubles might a marketer encounter by outsourcing any of these tasks? If you’re considering a third party for any or all of these tasks, consider these pros and cons first that will help you do your due diligence.

Pros and Cons of Outsourcing Social Media Activities

Design and Development

Design and development is one of those tasks that often plagues marketers. Some of us are analytical, some are content creators, some are graphically inclined — a lucky few are all three. But it makes sense to seek a third party for design and development work who has more expertise in creating a beautiful design (just like you may have done for your website). More importantly, it’s one-time or infrequent work that doesn’t require ongoing maintenance. There’s relatively low risk in asking an agency, firm, or contractor to do your social media design and development.

Unless, of course, you are so active in social media that you’re making constant changes and updates. Social media is changing quite frequently — just look at the new Twitter brand pages, the evolution of Pinterest, Facebook’s new page layout, and the release of Open Graph applications. Visual content is becoming more important for a social media strategy, brand pages are gaining new functionality and changing layouts, and if you’re really sophisticated, you might be experimenting with Open Graph. If you’re truly leveraging all of the new updates that come out, it may make sense to have a designer or developer on staff to help you respond quickly. But, all in all, having design and development managed by a third party is quite low risk.

Analytics

The State of Social Media Marketing Report showed that the number one question asked by marketers — for three years in a row, actually — was how to measure the ROI of social media marketing efforts. If marketers aren’t sure how to do this, it’s no wonder social media analytics is being outsourced to a third party. The problem is, the success of this is largely reliant on two things: the tool being used, and the person analyzing the data.

We’re obviously a big fan of using our own software to analyze the effectiveness of our social media marketing, because it offers closed-loop reporting. That means instead of just looking at how many likes, follows, or retweets you receive, you not only know whether you’re generating leads from your social media networks (and on which networks you do so most effectively), but also whether those leads turn into customers, and at what rate.

But because marketers are so confused about how to measure social media’s ROI, it’s certainly easy to be duped into using an agency’s proprietary or third-party analytics tool that may have tons of fancy graphs, lots of numbers, and export complicated spreadsheets — but it really doesn’t tell you how to do anything actionable to improve your social media marketing with that data. So if you’re considering using a third party for social media analytics, make sure that their tool not only offers closed-loop reporting, but that the person analyzing the data can also tell you how to use that information to improve your marketing strategy.

Content Creation

You need content to fuel your social media strategy, but it requires a high time investment that many marketers don’t have — perhaps one of the highest time investments of anything on this list. So it makes sense that content creation is outsourced. Go for it! Hire someone to create great blog content, ebooks/whitepapers, videos, and infographics that will make your social media presence valuable for your followers!

But start slow — ask for some writing samples and test content before committing to a large content creation contract. Just like there are many social media ninjas out there, there are plenty of freelance writers that may create subpar content or leave you hanging on a deadline. We’ve written a blog post about how to screen freelance writers if you’re considering going that route; but if you hire an agency, it’s likely the writers have been screened in advance. Just make sure you ask for samples that relate to your industry before putting pen to paper.

Monitoring

Social media monitoring can be a laborious chore at best, and a distracting one at worst — depending on the size of your following and what you use social media for. HubSpot, for example, has a social media following across accounts of about 318,000. We use those accounts for publishing content, talking to followers, and customer service triage. And we keep monitoring in-house, because we’ve found a way to do so without taking up much of our day (which we’ve shared with you in our ebook about Monitoring Your Social Media Presence in 10 Minutes a Day).

That being said, there are challenges that other businesses are faced with that make outsourced social media monitoring a logical solution. For example, international businesses or those that never really “close” may be receiving tweets 24/7. And it doesn’t look good when a serious customer service question can’t be answered in a timely manner, nor is it a pleasant working environment for a community manager who is constantly checking for customer service issues at all hours of the night. For businesses of this nature, outsourced monitoring makes sense — but only to agencies that truly understand your values and how you want to communicate with customers. We’ve covered what can happen when your agency doesn’t monitor social media for complaints in our post about AT&T’s Twitter SPAM snafu. If you choose to outsource monitoring, monitor your agency in the beginning, too.

Research & Strategy

I’ve combined “Research” and “Strategy” because, frankly, you can’t have one without the other. And just like social media analyzing is a common problem for marketers, many have also expressed confusion over how to create a social media strategy. The strategy is posting updates, right?

Wrong — and if you have an agency that is telling you that, run away fast. Posting updates is a tactic (which we’ll cover in the next section!) that helps you achieve a larger strategy. And a great consultant or agency will help draw that strategy out of you through diligent competitive and industry research, getting to know your business, and talking to you about your marketing and business goals. Then they should be able to outline a detailed plan for you about how to achieve that strategy — that either you, their staff, or another third party — can execute.

Is your consultant or agency asking you what your big picture goals are? Do you want to generate more leads, and think social media could help you do that? If so, what kind of leads? How will you nurture those leads after they’ve been generated? Or perhaps you need to improve your brand’s public image, and you think social media can help you do that. Will they be able to give you actionable advice on how to use social media as part of a larger branding strategy that differentiates yourself from your competitors and integrates with your other marketing activities? If these are the types of discussions you’re having with a third-party research and strategy provider, you have probably found a reliable consultant. But as we said before … beware the “ninjas” and “gurus” who can’t truly provide actionable advice that integrates with your larger marketing strategy.

Status Updates

Status updates are easy to integrate into your daily social media monitoring, especially if you take time out each week to schedule posts across all accounts using tools like HubSpot’s social media bookmarklet. If you’re already outsourcing your monitoring, ask if you can also integrate automated updating as a service. But this task is so simple to work into your day — especially since you’ll likely be publishing custom content, too — that a marketer on a budget could probably get more value spending their dollars elsewhere.

Community Management

While social media monitoring can be outsourced successfully when the proper protocol is in place, I believe community management is best left in-house — so I’m glad to see it as the least frequently outsources task on the list. While social media monitoring can simply be alerting the proper internal parties of a problem that arises on social media, community managers have a personal relationship with many members of their social media networks. Successful community managers identify influencers, get buy-in on controversial changes as a trusted member of the group, and often engage offline with many of their contacts.

The level of trust required to be a community manager is often diluted if fans and followers learn they’re dealing with an “outsider” from an agency. If you’re looking to fill a community manager position, your networks will have an easier time accepting someone from the inside.

Read more: http://blog.hubspot.com/blog/tabid/6307/bid/32208/Social-Media-Outsourcing-Increases-128-in-Two-Years-New-Report.aspx#ixzz1sxrsaf1B


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Marketing | Social Media | Public Relations | Event Planning | Brand Consulting

Jewish Social Media 101 – To Hire or To Outsource Jewish Social Media? You Decide!

Jewish Social Media 101 – To Hire or To Outsource Jewish Social Media? You Decide!

Social Media - In House or Outsource?Hiring a full time Social Media Strategist, though highly important in the new age of digital PR & fundraising, can be very expensive for the budget strapped non-profit or school. As shown below, you have to budget in between $46,000 to $71,000 for a Social Media Specialist alone (benefits not included). For Jewish companies, you also have to factor in health insurance, benefits, and the intangible “Jewish cost-of-living”, as well as the risk of high turnover due to the strong demand for Jewish social media employees. Plus, the ROI from social media is still tough to determine – is it how many “Likes” you get, or maybe the amount of “Tweets”? And how do you tie it back to sales? (this ALSO doesn’t take into account that your employees will end up being on Facebook all day. Not much work ethic there.)

Bear in mind also that many Jewish non-profits and schools are still focused on traditional methods of Jewish marketing & communications. Which is why advertising in Jewish print media has continued to remain stable while digital & social marketing lags behind. The extent of Jewish social media is the community shul listserve, such as Yahoo Groups or Google Groups, which is a textual Craigslist type of community bulletin board. Jewish social media groups have attempted to pop up though most are merely groups within Facebook & Linkedin. As a result, social media as a career hasn’t taken off in the Jewish marketplace, except as a freelance option.

Overall, the smarter choice is to outsource your Jewish social media (social media outsourcing rose 128% last year) to freelance experts who don’t require full-time employment but can do the job equally well. Using the outline of salaries and need for social media strategy, you can judge your need and decide what tasks you can outsource and what tasks to keep in house. Reposted from Onward Search, a Social Media Recruiting Firm.

http://www.onwardsearch.com/Social-Media-Salaries/


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Jewish Marketing 101 – Ditch the Graphic Designer. Get a Marketer.

Jewish Marketing 101 – Ditch the Graphic Designer. Get a Marketer.

Graphic DesignNothing says bad business and lost investment like an advertisement that doesn’t do what it’s supposed to do, which is bring in business. I’ve met clients who go through painstaking troubles to hire graphic artists to create the most eye-catching ad possible – the problem is many Photoshop, InDesign and Illustrator graphic designers lack the one tool that matters: marketing intelligence & experience.

If you’re a smart business, you know you need to ditch the graphic designer and get a marketer. 

A marketer understands the needs of the client go well beyond ad design. A marketer needs to know who your target market is, how to reach them, when to reach them, what will get through to them, what your budget is, what media outlets have a proven track record, and what you need to accomplish before, during, and after the ad campaign hits. Yeah, that’s a lot of stuff. Graphic designers know how to make an apple have fangs and only when someone advises them to do it for the apple with fangs business.

Ditch the graphic designer and get a marketer. The marketer creates a vision, concept, pitch and slogan for your brand. A designer simply takes those instructions and designs it. If you’re paying for a graphic designer that has no marketing experience, then not only are you wasting money on ad design (not to mention ad buys), you’re also risking your reputation as a business/service that is disconnected with the marketplace.

How can you tell if you have a designer or a marketer? Simple:

  • A marketer will provide an advertising gameplan and then design an ad that matches your goals, vision, and market.
  • A designer will show you their rates and portfolio of their capabilities, not a gameplan for where to advertise.
  • A marketer will recommend you measure responses through call tracking, promo codes, and QR codes.
  • A designer will say that adding those tracking options will detract from the look of the ad.
  • A marketer will tell you all about CPM, CTR, Open Rates, SEM, SEO, PPC, and more.
  • A designer will only give you two proofs to review before the final ad.
  • A marketer will list testimonials on their websites from successful customers.
  • A designer will list artwork yet no indication of client’s success.

So what would a good marketer say?


A great looking ad comes at a price. Knowing where to place it makes it an investment.

When you just get a graphic designer, all you have now is a great looking piece of artwork. You could hang it on the wall if you choose. Or you could invest it smartly into the best print, digital, and social places to bring in sales and get more business. Always ask before you hire a designer if they can handle media buying, media placements, strategy and market research. Until you know what, who, when, and where to target your customers, you just have a piece of PDF art. A smart marketer will know how to design your advertising for your intended market and then provide a media strategy for placing it. That’s an investment.

Develop a slogan.

Take a lesson from Walmart – develop a slogan, compel customers, to find out more and live by it. For years, Walmart’s tagline has been “Save Money. Live Better.” That tagline speaks to everyone in four words and compels people to visit a store or Walmart.com to see how they can save money on everything and actually live better with the savings they gain. Furthermore, it tells customers what to expect you’re your business. Home Depot wants to help you “Keep Improving” while Harley Davidson says what they stand for: “American by Birth. Rebel by Choice”. IBM delivers “Solutions for a Smarter Planet” and Nike urges people to “Just Do It”. You can see more here. What message are you telling your customers that you stand for? Even better, what are you telling your customers that your competitors aren’t? A good marketer knows how to develop an all-encompassing slogan that sums you up in half a sentence.

Reinforce, Reinforce, Reinforce.

Coca Cola grabbed headlines during Super Bowl season (go Giants!). InformationWeek reported on how Coca-Cola is going to be a marketing trailblazer that leverages their TV advertising through a massive social media effort. The days of simply watching a Super Bowl ad and then possibly buying a Coke are over; now, people can see the TV ad, “Like” Coke on Facebook, interact with the Coke Polar Bears online, and share the ads with people on their mobile devices and tablets. The message is simple – you have to reinforce your ad campaign in as many ways as possible. Does your store signage match your advertising? Is it consistent with your website, brochures & social media? Reinforcing can even be experimental – like CokePolarBowl.com – or very basic, like ensuring your print advertising is consistent with your business cards and branding collateral. More importantly, is your business image consistent with YOU? Even MORE important is how are you measuring it all?? Don’t drop the ball on the two-yard line. If you’re not reinforcing your image, you’re actually reducing the marketing effectiveness of your entire image.

Sometimes, You Need to Put your Opinion Aside.

When we were designing the print artwork for High Style Events, we were so convinced that our print design would be a great consistent theme, in line with our website, that would really grab the attention female clients. It took one comment from our female colleague – “it’s a bit dark” – to make us totally rethink our design. Although we were so passionate about the idea, we decided that we had to put my vision and idea’s to the side in favor of a member of our target market – females! If she says it’s too dark, then our target female market will consider it too dark and think we are in the dark-event business. Needless to say, we changed the print design to a more lavish, bright look with plenty of images and florals all around. Sometimes, you need to take your passions and vision out of the equation and let others – like your wife, your staff, or even clients – chime in with their opinions.

Be risky in your creative. But be truthful.

No one ever said you have to copy what your competitors are doing. Ever since Pomegranate started using a unique design for their advertising when they first opened, every Jewish supermarket tried to imitate the look and image. Well, Mendy’s Heimishe Bakery isn’t Pomegranate – it’s a bakery. A pretty small one. Don’t follow the crowd… create a new design so others follow you. And it’s ok to be risky and funny and bold and loud because it’s your business and your business has a unique personality. Be loud and creative in your logo but always stay truthful to what you are and what you represent. If you’re a small community bakery, highlight your “friendly service” & “fresh-baked” quality, not your valet parking. Own what your business is about and always highlight it.

Have a lot to say? Save it for the website or social media. 

Dozens of clients made the same mistake in their ads. They think the more information/value/deals they put in an ad, the more responses they’ll get from customers dying to take advantage of everything! Too many details in the ad will clog up the message. If you met someone in an elevator and went through your entire pitch about your business – who, where, what you sell, price, discounts, phone number, email, website, Facebook, Twitter, I guarantee that you will lose their interest. You know how people take eight seconds for a first impression? With an ad, you have less than 2 seconds to leave an impression. So get down to business and entice them to like what you’re about, pick up the phone, visit your website, or clip your coupon.

If you want to ensure a successful advertising campaign, the first step is to ditch the graphic designers. Marketing strategists and experienced advertisers are a better investment for future success.


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Jewish Marketing 101 – Benefit from Yeshiva Week

Jewish Marketing 101 – Benefit from Yeshiva Week

Yeshiva Week Break & Jewish Vacations

You’ve heard of New Year’s break, mid-winter break, and even Spring Break… but what about Yeshiva Week? This is the week when Jewish schools have off and it usually falls around mid-January – this year, it falls around the week of January 19th – January 29th. For Jewish parents who usually have a lax work schedule during the weeks of Christmas and New Years, this Yeshiva Week is finally a chance to take a vacation since their children are off from school. To have an opportunity to increase sales from any market at the start of the new year AND right after the (hopefully successful) shopping month of December, should be a welcome opportunity!

So how can you benefit from Yeshiva Week? Let’s explore:

Vacations in the Sun (and Snow)

This week is the ONE week where Jewish families can go on a FULL vacation without a holiday. On most week long breaks for Passover and Sukkot, families are tied down by certain holiday times that prevent traveling and entertainment. But for Yeshiva Week, with no holiday, each day can be used however they want! Some of the preferred destinations are Florida, Israel, Cancun, Bahamas, and Puerto Rico. Some prefer more local vacations to destinations such as Great Wolf Lodge, Mountain Creek, and the Poconos. Utah and Denver resorts have promoted their ski destinations as well to the Jewish market.

If you’re a vacation or destination spot looking for a bump in after-Christmas/New Year vacationers, Yeshiva Week is for you. Team up with your local Kosher restaurant or caterer to offer special package deals for a stay and food. The Jewish market loves to travel in groups, so a group rate will get the Jewish vacationer to build a group for traveling.

Day Trips

For those not vacationing, having the kids around the house for an entire week is definitely not what parents want! Museums, entertainment centers, bowling, arcades, aquariums, and other locations are great spots for day trips. Promote a “Yeshiva Week” deal in local Jewish media. Remember, if they come and visit your place, parents will be more likely to return for Passover break as well!

Yeshiva Week can help you start the New Year off in a uniquely beneficial way.


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Jewish Marketing 101 – Why Non-Profits Should Consider Outsourcing

Jewish Marketing 101 – Why Non-Profits Should Consider Outsourcing

Jewish social media outsourcing
Reposted from Third Sector Magazine

Why Not-For Profit’s should consider outsourcing

Wed, 12 October 2011

Outsourcing is becoming increasingly popular in the not-for-profit sector as it allows associations, charities and other not-for-profit organisations to benefit from the expertise of specialists when they need them and at rates they can afford.

Outsourcing refers to contracting the skills of a company to fulfil an organisation’s needs and allows them to take advantage of experts that they do not have, or cannot afford, internally. This may include marketing, graphic design, organising conferences and events, secretariat services, publishing, marketing or finance.

Outsourcing is a cost-effective way for not-for-profit (NFP) organisations to achieve their organisation’s goals and keep within their budget.

Findings from The Outsourcing Institute’s most recent study, which surveyed 1,410 members, found that reducing and controlling costs is the most common reason organisations choose to outsource. With a limited budget NFPs often can’t afford five or more employees to fulfil their organisation’s marketing, graphic design, editorial, secretariat and event needs; and it’s difficult to find one person with skills in all of these areas. However, outsourcing allows NFPs to draw on the skills of specialist departments with differing areas of expertise for often less than the cost of hiring one internal employee. Depending on a NFPs needs outsourcing can be the equivalent of employing ten specialists for less than the price of one.

Not only is outsourcing more cost effective than hiring staff internally, it can also result in a great level of efficiency. With access to teams of experts in a range of fields, organisations can enjoy a more professional standard of work, which can improve efficiency, the image and reputation of the organisation, and increase member/donor support.

CEO of The Institute of Hospital Engineers Australia Greg Bondar outsources their member magazine to Third Sector Services. He says “I am of the view that specialisation is the key to productivity and effective cost management, hence why do what others do better?”

The Australian Counselling Association (ACA) CEO Philip Armstrong also outsources their magazine to Third Sector Services and says “The journal in its ten year history had reached its optimum in relation to delivering a peer reviewed journal to members that was produced internally by the association. To go to the next level and compete internationally in design, content and layout with other similar journals it needed the expertise of professional publishers as this was not and is not the expected strength of ACA. Therefore an external publisher was sought to take the journal to the next level.”

The Outsourcing Institute’s research shows that the second most common reason organisations outsource is that it allows them to focus on their key objectives, which can increase their effectiveness and improve member/donor satisfaction.

Outsourcing allows an organisation to focus on what is most important to the running of their association, society, institute or charity – whether it is advocacy, governance, pleasing members or fundraising.

Additionally, outsourcing allows NFPs flexibility which is not achievable when hiring someone internally. Outsourcing allows organisations to access professionals when and only for as long as an organisation needs them.

“Without sounding gratuitous, the services provided Third Sector Services are both professional and friendly, and very flexible,” admits Bondar.

By decreasing costs, improving the quality of an organisation’s offerings and allowing NFPs to focus on their core objectives, outsourcing is expected to continue to rise in popularity as the smarter choice for NFPs.


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Jewish Marketing 101 – Social Media Influencing Decisions on Kosher Consumption (KosherToday)

Jewish Marketing 101 – Social Media Influencing Decisions on Kosher Consumption (KosherToday)

Kosher Social MediaSocial Media Influencing Decisions on Kosher Consumption, But Not There Yet

Reposted from Kosher Today

New York…The effect of social media on the consumption of kosher foods is for all practical purposes a case of two separate cities. In an exhaustive look at the subject, KosherToday found that in a good segment of the kosher market, social media is beginning to play a significant role in influencing brand and product consumption while in some Charedi (Orthodox) communities social media is still linked to an overall distrust and even forbidden medium of the Internet. “Since this customer still makes up a large percentage of daily kosher food sales, bridging this gap will be important if social media will take off for the kosher category,” says Yakov M. Yarmove, Corporate Business Manager, Ethnic Marketing and Specialty Foods for SuperValu. But KosherToday found that even in such Orthodox communities as Flatbush and Monsey, some stores are feeling the effects of social media, particularly when some of their premium items go on sale. “I will sometimes have 15-20 shoppers a day ask for an item on sale that they flagged on either Facebook or Twitter,” said a Flatbush retailer.

Esti Berkowitz of primetimeparenting.com and Travelingmom.com, a leader in the growing kosher foodie network using social media, says that social media is influencing purchases at the grocery store. “A lot of these purchasing decisions come directly from the online distribution of circulars from the supermarket,” she says. In fact, she points to a study conducted by Ken Johns, VP, Director of 1:1 at Brunner which found that amongst more than 400 women with children age 12 and under, nearly 96% of the respondents said they check e-mail at least once a day and eight in ten moms indicated they want to receive offers and information from preferred brands via email. A number of major retailers have been using Facebook and Twitter to communicate with their loyal customers, a trend that kosher industry sources say is beginning to take hold in the kosher community as well. It bodes well for the introduction of new products, which in many instances drives profits in the kosher set. Says Mrs. Berkowitz: “The gain for new products via social media is increasing steadily.  People are looking to blogs and social media for reviews and recommendations of food and beverages.” She points to the results of The Social Media Matters Study (April 2011) that 53% of the participants had become repeat buyers based on a blog recommendation.

Leah Schapira is one of those foodies who have developed a passion for using social media to promote good kosher cooking. A  well-known food columnist and recipe developer in the kosher world, she recently launched Cookkosher.com as a platform for sharing information on ingredients, recipes, new products and almost everything else that a kosher consumer and cook would need Not very much. Says Schapira: “I don’t think that the influence of social media has spread wide enough in the kosher world yet.” She does, however, see social media as a boon for new products because of the relationship it establishes between manufacturer and consumer. “The ability to easily and quickly solicit feedback from consumers can help a new product adjust its course in line with ever-changing demands and preferences,” says Schapira. Although there appeared to be dramatic developments in the impact of social media on kosher consumption, most kosher industry sources agreed that the trend is definitely on the side of a new generation of social media kosher foodies.


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Jewish Marketing 101 – Harvard Business Review on Outsourcing your Marketing

Jewish Marketing 101 – Harvard Business Review on Outsourcing your Marketing

 

Harvard Business Review Outsourcing

Here’s a highly informative Q and A from Harvard Business Review on the pro’s and con’s on outsourcing your marketing…

Should You Outsource Your Marketing?

Most companies already outsource a portion of their marketing function—advertising. But what about direct-mail management, lead management, or customer analytics? Increasingly, expertise in these and other marketing areas lies outside your own walls. And that is why more and more companies are turning to marketing partners.

Harvard Business School professors Gail J. McGovern and John Quelch documented the trend in an article in the March issue of Harvard Business Review. One reason behind the move? While company marketing departments have plenty of talented right-brain, creative types, they may lack the left-brain analytics needed to better understand their customers in today’s information-rich environment.

Besides, argue McGovern and Quelch, outsourcing marketing can lead to better quality and lower costs.

McGovern offers a unique perspective: Before joining the HBS faculty in 2002, she was president of the Fidelity Personal Investments unit of Fidelity Investments, serving 4 million customers with $500 billion in assets.

She answers our questions in this e-mail Q&A.

Poping Lin: We are familiar with the benefits of outsourcing various corporate functions, but the idea of outsourcing marketing, at least beyond advertising, seems relatively new. Can you discuss this concept and the potential benefits to businesses?

Gail J. McGovern: The outsourcing of marketing activities is catching on; in fact, in a recent poll of marketing executives, 53 percent reported plans to outsource most of their marketing activities.

The benefits to business include cost savings and improved quality. Additionally, many firms lack “left-brain” analytical skills in-house, even though those skills are becoming more important than ever in an age of one-to-one marketing, and find that outside expertise is often needed. Sony, a legendary marketer, outsourced its program to market products through its online “Sony Style” store, recognizing that they needed expertise in areas such as customer database construction.

With media fragmentation, such decisions will become far more common, because companies can no longer rely on mass marketing to reach prospective customers. Communication tasks have become much more complicated, and therefore more dependent on computer-aided analysis.

Q: What marketing functions should and should not be outsourced?

A: Companies stand to benefit considerably by outsourcing, for example, analytical functions to qualified suppliers if those skills are lacking in-house. But some aspects of marketing are less amenable to outsourcing—those that directly drive marketing strategy.

While computers are important, the CEO and top managers still need to meet regularly with customers. Companies need chief marketing officers to drive marketing strategy and make the most of the company’s customer relationships. And companies still need flesh-and-blood employees to win and service major accounts.

Q: What is the role of the head marketing executive who oversees an outsourcing program in his or her department?

A: The skills required of the marketing manager are rapidly changing. Today, managers are like ringmasters in a circus; they must understand how to access the skills they need, since in practice they are relying on a variety of in-house and outside suppliers to get the job done.

Q: What are the keys to consider in successfully managing outsourcing relationships?

A: Marketing managers need to nurture ongoing relationships with outside suppliers. The best outsourcing arrangements are partnerships. Suppliers should not be regarded as mere contractors, since contractors do not always perceive a long-term stake in the project’s success.

The value created should be seen as shared value. Managing suppliers in this way requires a great deal of skill and competencies that are not always resident within a firm. This challenge requires negotiation and communications skills as well as a strong ability to project manage several elements of various marketing campaigns.

Q: Is there a tie between outsourcing marketing and the increased global outsourcing we see in other functions? Will offshore marketing be next?

A: There are some strong connections. Motivation, for one. Companies in general turn to outsourcing as a means of saving money while accessing the skills they need, whether it’s marketing or IT services.

As companies have become more comfortable and familiar with outsourcing arrangements, they’ve become willing to trust outside suppliers with business functions that, until recently, have not been outsourced.

Q: What are you working on now?

A: I am exploring board governance issues, specifically the role that boards should play in ensuring the effectiveness and efficiency of the marketing function in a firm.

About the author

Poping Lin is a business information librarian at Baker Library, Harvard Business School, with a specialty in marketing.

Copyright © 2011 President and Fellows of Harvard College

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Jewish PR 101 – How to NOT lose readers attention when posting on social media

Jewish PR 101 – How to NOT lose readers attention when posting on social media

Here’s a great blog post from http://www.businesswordsmiths.com talking about readers new attention span.

Studies say that you’ve got 10 seconds to capture readers attention. Getting even shorter in time, they say you have 8 seconds to make a good impression. So how can you best deal with a readers short attention span?

The Jewish Impact : Within the Jewish market, there are numerous community listservs with thousands of email recipients (such as TeaneckShuls, BrooklynShuls, FiveTownsShuls, etc). If the recipients inbox are anything like mine, then it’s being inundated with various emails with a hug assortment of subject lines and posts for, about, and to the community. So if your subject line doesn’t grab them, you can forget about them scrolling down to read your post. Here’s how to best get your email read on these listservs:

The 3 Keys to Handling

Today’s Short Attention Span

* Speak to Emotion First, Intellect Second

A quick look at today’s top business news from Digg, has article as the top item:

Where Jamie Oliver Failed, Carrot Farmers Hope to Change the Way We Snack
Jamie Oliver tried to change the way kids eat with his (futile) attempts at changing the food that school cafeterias serve to kids. If you’re a parent, and you feel strongly about the health of your kids, this headline grabs you at both an emotional and intellectual level.

It creates curiosity by stimulating an already-existing desire to feed your kids healthy stuff.

The article itself isn’t terribly interesting, but about halfway down the page they include the following YouTube video from carrot farmers:

Obviously, this video is intended for the parents. It’s a tongue-in-cheek way to get the attention of parents, and give them a reason to “test” the theory that carrots can achieve the same status as junk food in their kids’ minds.

* Quickly offer a promise

What I like about the new carrot farmer campaign is that they quickly offer a promise, albeit a twisted promise.

They promise that your kids will think of carrots the same way they think of a candy bar, French fries, or some other greasy, sugar-enhanced snack.

They hit an emotional hot-button by bringing up the futility of getting kids to eat healthy food, and then have the audacity to promise a change in the way your kids think about snacking.

Your promise doesn’t have to be blatant, but it’s got to be clear in the mind of your reader. All of this will happen in a few short seconds in your headline and the first couple paragraphs of your copy.

* Deliver on the promise

The best way to keep your website visitors on your site is to deliver on the promises you make, and do so as quickly as possible. I know that I have a tendency as a writer to think that everyone needs several paragraphs of introduction before I get to the meat of the matter.

A lengthy introduction can help when you’re introducing a new product to people who don’t yet know that they need your product. Eugene Schwartz refers to this as your reader’s “level of awareness” about you, your product, and their need for your product.

Carrot farmers are betting that kids will eat whatever comes in a flashy package. The “delivery” of the promise in their case isn’t the product (carrots) itself, but the packaging for the product.

Time will tell if they’re right (I hope they are), and kids realize that healthy food can be just as enjoyable an experience as unhealthy food.

It’s a long shot for the carrot industry, but if it works, expect national brands to quickly follow suit, offering their snacks (healthy or otherwise) in flashier packaging.

Henry Isaacs

www.Henry-Isaacs.com