Jewish Event Planning 101 – Tips for Destination Weddings and Events In Israel

Jewish Event Planning 101 – Tips for Destination Weddings and Events In Israel

Destionation Weddings and Events in IsraelPlanning a destination wedding in Israel when you live elsewhere is beyond stressful; it could be downright disastrous without oversight of the event services and venue. What would you do if the orchestra fails to show up on time? Or the venue is doubly booked? As an American in Israel, you may be limited in your options at that point.

Not to worry – as Jewish event planners, we have tips for making sure your destination wedding and destination Bar Mitzvah or Bat Mitzvah meets your best expectations.

1) Establish an event planning team abroad and at home

Connecting with an Israeli event planner in Israel is a no brainer since you’ll have to coordinate the entire event from your U.S. phone and laptop! But the best way to gain oversight over an event planner in Israel is to have an event planner at home as well. You’ll have to coordinate flight, travel, invitations, hotel arrangements, and formalwear in the U.S. as well, so choose a team of event planners that work well together. There are a few event planners in Israel that work with American Jewish event planners so you’ll save money on utilizing both their services as well as reducing stress for a truly multi-national event!

2) Negotiate, Negotiate, Negotiate

That’s the way Israeli businessman and businesswomen operate. Unlike American pricing for event services, Israeli event services expect you to haggle. Don’t be afraid to tell them they are too high or you found a better price somewhere else. At the end of the day, they love to be part of a simcha in Israel; Sabra’s love Americans willing to support them and the Israeli economy.

3) Invitations come first.

in order to lock in the best rates on airfare and ensure your favorite spot is prepped and ready for you, invites should be sent first. Your guests aren’t exactly driving an hour away to a venue; they’re flying for 10 hours to a different country. Your guests need prep time to arrange their schedules and flights and you need to know who’s coming to your destination Israel event. Get the invites out of the way first and everything will be smoother after you have your guest list set.

4) Go ancient.

The best feature of Israel is it’s blend of modernity and ancient – who wouldn’t want a wedding on a Herzliya beach with a full feast at a local three star hotel! But we love going ancient. We were at a magnificent wedding that took place in a leafy garden amidst an ancient trail and nature reserve in the heart of Israel and the lighting, natural décor, and weather made for a beautiful destination wedding. After all, the essence of Israel and it’s history is why you’re having a destination event after all, isn’t it? Israeli event services are well-prepared to handle any off-site details so don’t worry about how your DJ or chuppah will be set up amidst the Caesarean ruins or on the Herzliya beach.

Keep visiting our blog for more tips on planning your event details in the least stressful way for your destination event in Israel!


High Style EventsStylish Event Planners for the Jewish Event

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Destination Weddings In Israel will be boosted by Israel’s marketing budget boost

Destination Weddings In Israel will be boosted by Israel’s marketing budget boost

Destination Weddings in Israel

Reposted from Arutz Sheva

Israel Set to Spend Millions Marketing Tourism By December

Between now and the end of the year Israel’s Tourism Ministry will have spent more than NIS 40 million on marketing the nation abroad.
By Chana Ya’ar

First Publish: 9/19/2011, 1:13 AM
Simchat Torah

Simchat Torah
Israel news photo

If all goes well, between now and the end of the year Israel’s Tourism Ministry will have spent more than NIS 40 million on marketing the nation abroad.

Israel’s “autumn flush” is being seen as an investment in the country’s economy, with an eye toward creating continuity in marketing activities abroad.

The outreach to potential tourists and building an increase in tourism traffic to the Jewish State, while establishing the country as an attractive tourism destination, is part of the ministry’s 2011 work plan, according to a statement issued Sunday.

The ministry has budgeted some NIS 260 million for marketing activities alone, a smart investment when one considers the return.

From January to August of this year, 2.2 million tourists have visited Israel, just two percent fewer than last year in the same period.

Income from incoming tourism alone during the first half of the year has increased by 15 percent, to some NIS 8.2 billion, as compared to NIS 7.1 billion for the same period a year earlier. This figure does not include income from flights.

Countries being targeted in the current campaign include the United States, followed by Russia, Germany, France, Italy, Spain and Scandinavian nations, in conjunction with marketing activities in countries that have recently become interested in Israel, such as Poland and Brazil.

“The autumn tourism season is an attractive time of year to travel to Israel, and the Ministry of Tourism’s offices abroad are working toward increasing demand to visit Israel,” noted Tourism Minister Stas Misezhnikov.

“The stability of incoming tourism, despite economic and political events, both regionally and internationally, presents an important economic anchor contributing to the Israeli economy both in income and employment.”

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Jewish Event Planning 101 – High Style Events Tips article from In Fashion Magazine

Jewish Event Planning 101 – High Style Events Tips article from In Fashion Magazine

High Style Events article - In FashionOur High Style Events division had our High Styled Tips article published in the premier Jewish magazine for the affluent Jewish household, In Fashion Magazine (www.infashionft.com). We’ve included the entire tips in our blog but if you can pick up the magazine, that’s even better! We look forward to placing our stamp of High Style on your event!

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High Style Events Article

| In Fashion Magazine |

When it comes to special events, we love to High Style them. We believe your event is one of a kind and should reflect that uniqueness every step of the way, from concept to completion. So we’re sharing some of our favorite High Styled ideas that we’ve
innovated and come across that can really turn your event into an extraordinary
celebration:

Go Stylish on Your Placecards

Make a first and lasting an impression with customized placecards. We know of a wedding where the placecards were tiny customized Tiffany boxes for
each attendee – if you receive a Tiffany’s box as your placecard, you KNOW
uniqueness – for non-profit gala dinners, try a hinting yet playful money
clip placecard holder. For corporate or trade show events, we love a
customized MingleStick (check it out on our Facebook page, High Style
Events). For social events, a tiny picture frame with the attendee’s pictures is a glorious, welcoming, and personal touch.

Tailor Your Man
Women go to far lengths to tailor their dresses and outfits for a special
event. Three to five dress fittings for a wedding gown, mother of the
bride, or Bat Mitvah dress is standard procedure. But nothing is more asymmetrical than a elegantly dressed woman and blandly dressed man. Take  the time to ensure your husband, son, or fiancé dresses PERFECTLY. For
your man, remember: the suit could be the most expensive suit or tuxedo in
all of New York but if it doesn’t fit well on him, you’re wasting your
money. Buying an affordable fitted suit from Zara or Calving Klein is step one and tailoring it even more perfectly is step two. Plus, don’t solely
rely on the tailors at department stores like Lord & Taylor or Saks with promises of free tailoring with a suit purchase – take your suit to a trusted tailor that you know can make it perfect. Same with tuxedos – get your tailor to look at it and see it on you before you buy or rent. Add even more High Style – if you’re getting a custom-made dress designed, ask your tailor to use the extra fabric swatches and design a matching tie or pocket square, even for a cummerbund, for your special man. Nothings says stylish more than two well-dressed (and matching!) people.

Ditch the Keyboard. Go for a DJ.
For smaller events where orchestra’s just don’t make sense, party like
it’s 2011. Ditch the one man band and singer/keyboardist and go for the
     DJ. DJ’s have numerous musical styles available to them at the push of a
button – Sephardic, Fusion, Rock, Dance, etc – and are in the same price
range as a keyboardist anyway. The difference – DJ’s up the “cool factor”
by a thousand percent and dictate the party mode of the event much better.
No disrespect to keyboardists (keyboards went out of style back in the
1990’s along with SmashMouth and Genesis) but I haven’t heard anyone come
to an event and say “Wow, you have a keyboardist!”; they say “Wow, you got
a DJ!” And at your event, we know you want to have that “WOW Factor”.

High Style Tip of the Month – The Wedding Interior Designer

Go the extra mile and hire an
     interior designer to oversee your entire venue and recommend stylish
     elements. For people getting married in special venues (catering halls,
country club, etc), the venue is pre-designed for elegance so all you need
to add is your extra bit of style to accentuate the venue’s elegance.
However, for those getting married in Synagogues or other locations
designed for usefulness, placing just flowers throughout simply won’t High
Style your event to reflect your uniqueness. So we recommend going the
extra mile and hiring an interior designer to see what stylish elements
can be added to really make your event extremely stylish. Some floral
decorators offer this service but, as you’ll see in the next tip,
specialized means customized (and you won’t necessarily pay more at all).

Specialized means Customized
We’ve met so many vendors who tack on different tasks in order to offer
more than what they normally do. For example: Florists & Caterers.
Caterers & Event Planners. Musicians & Photography. Photography
& Carpet Cleaning. Chuppah Designers & Coffin Designers (don’t
hire these guys!). Basically, they add more services in order to increase
revenue but remember – the more un-specialized, the less you can
customize. If they don’t specialize in one task, they can’t excel in the
     one task you really want them to do. Caterers should focus on amazing
food, not  Find specialists and you can tell them EXACTLY what you
would like so they can customize the event to you and EXCEL in it. Don’t
you deserve customized service at your special event? We know you do.

With these tips, now you can start putting a stamp of High Style on your special event!

Olivia Bondarsky is the highly experienced Lead Event Planner at High Style
Events, a team of Jewish event planners specializing in the Jewish event. Like
Us on Facebook (www.facebook.com/highstyleevents) and be automatically entered for a chance to win a $150 Gift Card to Glatt A La Carte. Our treat! Call us at 347.433.4276 or 201.357.2622 or Visit us at www.HighStyleEvents.com for more information and “High Style” Tips!

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Jewish Event Planning 101 – Wedding FLOPS is a Good Thing

Jewish Event Planning 101 – Wedding FLOPS is a Good Thing

High Style Events | Stylish Event Planners for the Jewish Event

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UNDERSTANDING FLOPS

Congratulations and Mazal Tov – you’re engaged! We both know that wedding planning isn’t entirely smooth sailing; the question is, though – who splits the responsibilites so things run somewhat smoothly?

For Jewish weddings, there are traditionally two options when it comes to planning and divvying up the responsibilities for a Jewish wedding.  The first option in when the groom’s and bride’s family split the wedding tasks 50/50, down the middle regarding budget, planning, negotiation, and respnsibility from the hall to the caterer, music to the flowers and more. On one hand, this option is the most sensible way of planning a union of two families; on the flip side, difficulties seeing eye to eye and misguided comunication may arise since the two families barely know each other.

An alternative and increasingly popular option is what people call the “FLOPS” option.  FLOPS essentially assigns the groom’s family the tasks of handling the Flowers, Liquor, Orchestra, Photography and Sheitel (the term for wig, the traditional Orthodox head covering – see our post on Shaitels).  The bride’s family in turn handles all other aspects of the wedding, including the hall, the caterer, the invitations, and other services.  Although it seems that this option may attribute higher costs to one side, surprisingly, the costs for the bride and groom’s family are very similar.

Let’s dive into the details and ideas behind FLOPS:

PRIORITY ONE – Arrange your FLOPS.

FLOPS is totally determined by a persons tastes and budget and establishing a hierarchy for your FLOPS – be it LOPSF, PFSLO, SFLOP or any other combination – is the key for managing costs and placing the important items first. For example, ethnic Modern Orthodox couples may place a priority on Liquor over other stuff, so they could technically rearrange the FLOPS priority into LFOPS. Others may desire to have an ethnic feel to their wedding and opt for an orchestra that can accomodate ethnic music and sounds, so they would have Orchesta as a top priority. Know how you want to arrange your FLOPS hierarchy, and you’ll have a more cost-effective and personalized wedding.

Now, for the actual terms in FLOPS:

Flowers: Flowers are great, but combining flowers and decor are even better. You have to make a judgement call to determine if flowers at the hall/venue are enough. Synagogue, Temple, and Jewish Center sites are great affordable venue options but placing a few bouqets and floral arrangements on the table or at the chuppah are nice but not necessarily “florally decorated”; and unlike halls or country clubs, most Synagogues need some sprucing up by a decorator.

Liquor:  When planning a wedding, many people think that an open bar is the more expensive route, yet that’s not always the case. For instance, if the wedding hall has a liquor license, and you don’t have an open bar, then you have to buy the bottles from the hall and it can be very expensive.  A ten dollar bottle can be doubled if you buy it from the hall.  But an open bar can be as little as five or six dollars a person. Know what your hall can accomodate and see if they have vendors that can save you money buying directly if you choose to bring in your own alcohol.

Orchestra:  Because music sets the tone of a wedding, this aspect of FLOPS is usually the most expensive. Get a wide variety of quotes and make sure you hold everyone accountable to their agreements. For Jewish weddings, a DJ is great but usually only supplemental to an orchestra. Be sure to negotiate – many orchestras realize that Orthodox weddings are in a time-crunch so they won’t waver on price… until you bring a competiting offer to the negotiating table.

Photography: Determine if you’d like a classic photographer or perhaps a photojournalistic feel (kind of like picture storytelling). When looking into a photographer you need to look at two things. Most photographers don’t share the pictures so they will offer to make the albums for you but be sure you event WANT albums. In this social media age, having a CD of pictures to upload to Facebook or OnlySimchas could be a cheaper, more gratifiying method of remembering your special day, so be sure you’re not paying for albums if you don’t want them (especially since albums can be upwards of $800 for one album). Explore your quote to see if video or the albums are being included and if you can negotiate down by omitting them if you’d like.

Sheitel: We have a whole other post on Sheitels written by our female head Event Planner. Check it out here!

So that’s the FLOPS option. If you go that route, knowing your hierarchy will be the key to saving money, increasing the style, and making sure both families have their needs and desires accounted for!

Henry Isaacs

www.Henry-Isaacs.com

Jewish Event Planning 101 – A Behind The Bar Mitzvah Parody Video

Jewish Event Planning 101 – A Behind The Bar Mitzvah Parody Video

High Style Events | Stylish Event Planners for the Jewish Event

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Very very cute and innovative. And cheaper than Kanye West.

Henry Isaacs

www.HighStyleEvents.com

Jewish Event Planning 101 – The Persian/Iranian Six Figure Wedding Dilemma

Jewish Event Planning 101 – The Persian/Iranian Six Figure Wedding Dilemma

The<br />
Jewish Journal
October 13, 2007

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Iranian Jewish couples trapped by six-figure party dilemma

By Karmel Melamed

http://www.jewishjournal.com/iranianamericanjews/item/iranian_jewish_couples_trapped_by_six_figure_party_dilemma/

Sam Cohan recently completed his residency. As he looked for a job locally, his student loans weighed on him. The 30-something Iranian Jew had grown up middle class in the Valley and had to take out the loans to pay for his education at a prestigious medical school.

With no immediate prospect for income, he found himself caught between feelings of frustration and guilt as his fiancee, her parents and his parents pressured him into a wedding he couldn’t afford.

Cohan didn’t want to break with Iranian tradition or disappoint either family, so he borrowed nearly $100,000 to cover the wedding expenses.

“I felt trapped with the whole situation and wanted to call everything off, but I decided to take the loan in the end because my wife agreed that we’d both work and pay it off little by little,” said Cohan, who asked that The Journal not reveal his real name.

Cohan is one of a growing number of young Iranian Jewish professionals who, due to family pressure, are incurring large debts to pay for lavish weddings.

Somewhere between keeping Iranian hospitality traditions and one-upping displays of wealth, a growing number of Iranian Jewish families today are inviting upward of 500 guests to weddings, with budgets in the six-figure range—typically from $150,000 to $300,000.

The strain of such expectations has led to infighting between families over who should cover the cost. Young professionals are also postponing marriage plans or opting instead for a destination wedding to avoid the financial pressures of holding the event in Los Angeles.

Most local Iranian Jews acknowledge the situation, but few in the community are willing to advocate for change. Rabbi Hillel Benchimol, associate rabbi of the Nessah Synagogue in Beverly Hills, wants a greater dialogue on the issue.

“The problem is we are taking out the spiritual and emotional aspect of the marriage and instead it’s become a business with all the unnecessary spending,” Benchimol said. “People forget the spirit of the wedding—all you need is love, and everything else falls into place.”

Some young Iranian Jewish newlyweds say that while they did not necessarily want a large wedding, they feel pressure from their parents and extended family to put on a more lavish affair. Their parents, they say, feel an obligation to invite people whose parties they have attended.

“Persians have much more of a tight-knit community, and it’s very respect oriented—that’s not necessarily a bad thing, but it leads to 300- to 400-person weddings,” said Ario Fakheri, who was married last year. “People get upset if you don’t invite their kids or grandmothers, they look at it as disrespecting them—there are so many ways to disrespect them.”

Fakheri said that while he and his fiancee invited almost 600 people to their wedding due to family pressure, many of his friends in the community are opting to have destination weddings.

“You can tell how bad they don’t want people to come to their wedding by how far away they go,” Fakheri said. “It’s basically code for how bad you want to have a normal wedding.”

Iranian Jewish religious leaders said the cost has resulted in several weddings being called off and some couples divorcing within a few months of getting married. There’s also concern that local Iranian Jews will marry outside of the community or outside of the faith in order to escape the mounting six-figure wedding pressure.

Community activists trace the growing trend back two or three years ago when local Iranian Jews began inviting 100 to 200 guests for their children’s bale boroon parties.

The bale boroon is a traditional Iranian courtship gathering prior to the engagement, during which a dozen members from the male suitor’s family visits with a small contingent from the woman’s family. During the gathering both families acknowledge the upcoming union and offer a small gift to one another.

“Today, when they have these large parties for the bale boroon, they must then top that with something bigger for the engagement party, and as a result the wedding must be an even bigger extravaganza than the other parties,” said Asher Aramnia, events director for the Eretz-SIAMAK Cultural Center in Tarzana.


(Asher Aramnia, photo by Karmel Melamed)

Aramnia, who also volunteers as a Jewish matchmaker, said the recent trend of expensive weddings were not the norm in Iran.

“In Iran we didn’t even have catering. The family members cooked the food or those who were well-off hired one private cook,” he said. “Here I’ve been to a wedding where the groom bought the bride a cherry-red BMW and put it on display at the entrance of the hotel for all the guests to see.”

Aramnia said at another wedding he witnessed a diamond-encrusted tiara being lowered from the ceiling onto the bride’s head.

Venus Safaie, a local Iranian wedding planner with 85 percent of her clients hailing from an Iranian Jewish background, said the highest costs for most weddings she helps organize come from securing a venue at a hotel and finding Persian-language singers, who charge $8,000 to $15,000 for two or three hours of entertainment.

“Well, you have to realize that these Persian singers charge more because the cost of living has gone up, and there are not that many of them around, so they can ask whatever price they want,” Safaie said. “Also people agree to pay them these high prices, so you can’t blame the singers.”

Dara Abaei, head of the L.A. nonprofit Jewish Unity Network, said his organization has been urging families to have smaller weddings. The group has also negotiated with certain vendors to give reduced fees to couples struggling to pay for their weddings.

“We’re trying to break the cycle in the community, to get them to not have engagement parties or get smaller engagement parties and try to share the cost of wedding,” he said.

Abaei said couples can save between $7,000 to $15,000 if they hold their weddings at the banquet halls of Iranian American Jewish Federation’s synagogue in West Hollywood, the Nessah Synagogue in Beverly Hills and the Eretz-SIAMAK Cultural Center in Tarzana.

Another group, Woodland Hills-based Mayan Kheset, provides silk flower centerpieces in lieu of real flowers. The organization’s volunteers drop off and pick up the arrangements, and only ask that couples donate the money they would have spent on flowers.

“We encourage people to try to support a wedding of an orphan in Israel,” said Hirbod Cohentoe, Mayan Kheset’s founder. “We encourage couples not make their weddings so fancy, but donate some of the money to Israel or their favorite Jewish charity.”

While many local activist and religious leaders are trying to encourage Iranian Jewish families to have smaller weddings, others are calling for more radical steps to be taken.

“I have always wanted to see a revolution occur in the community when two or three affluent families that everyone knows very well, invite only 200 or 300 close relatives and friends for their weddings,” Aramnia said. “This will cause others who are trying to ‘keep up with the Joneses’ to copy them, and it may help solve our problem.”

Despite the community’s struggles to keep with old traditions and grapple with the high cost of weddings, experts said the pressure on young couples to have larger weddings is common in almost every culture worldwide.

“Well, there’s an old saying, ‘Every woman gets to plan a wedding—her daughter’s,’” said Dr. Sharona Nazarian, an Iranian Jewish psychologist. “It’s not just because we’re Persian or Jewish that we’re concerned. It’s universal, something that many brides and grooms have to deal with.”

While members of the local Iranian Jewish community said they were not opposed to those who had the financial means to have expensive weddings, they hoped others without such means would reconsider spending when they have to incur large debts.

“If someone can comfortably afford to spend lavishly on the wedding, that is their choice,” Nazarian said. “But it’s also important for families to work within their own means and be more concerned with their own needs as opposed to what others think about them.”

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Jewish Event Planning 101 – Tradition Meets Style: Beautiful Bukharian Wedding At The Pierre NYC

Jewish Event Planning 101 – Tradition Meets Style: Beautiful Bukharian Wedding At The Pierre NYC

High Style Events | Stylish Event Planners for the Jewish Event

P. 201.357.2622 | E. Events@HighStyleEvents.com | www.HighStyleEvents.com

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Weddings | Bar & Bat Mitzvahs | Social Events | Non-Profit | Corporate

Jewish Event Planning | Event Consulting | Day-of Coordination | Per-Diem Planning | Concierge Services

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Henry Isaacs

http://www.HighStyleEvents.com

Jewish Events 101 – Pearls, henna and challah: Sephardic nuptial customs

Jewish Events 101 – Pearls, henna and challah: Sephardic nuptial customs

Persian HennaPearls, henna and challah: Sephardic nuptial customs

Reprinted from JWeekly

Friday, November 8, 1996 | byBRIGITTE DAYAN

If you think the aufruf feting a groom-to-be always takes place the Shabbat before the wedding and that all Jewish brides and grooms fast on their wedding day, think again.

There are some notable differences between Ashkenazic and Sephardic weddings.

And even among Sephardic Jews, says Rabbi Michael Azose of the Sephardic Congregation in Evanston, Ill., there are as many rituals as there are communities.

“It’s impossible to pigeonhole Sephardim,” Azose said. “I’ve learned through my congregants that Persians are very different from Syrians, who are very different than Judeo-Spanish Jews.”

Many Sephardic Jews, particularly North Africans, begin weddings several days before the actual ceremony with an elaborate party to which the bride wears an embroidered velvet dress adorned with pearls and other jewels. Often, this dress is a family heirloom.

After guests share a meal, henna dye is painted on each woman’s palm, symbolizing both fertility and protection against the evil eye.

In Ashkenazic circles, a bride-to-be visits the mikveh (ritual bath) with a close female relative, usually in private. But in Sephardic tradition, all the women of the community accompany the bride-to-be and her mother and sisters to the mikveh. Afterward they enjoy a lavish feast of sweets, then dance in the mikveh’s foyer.

In Spanish-speaking communities, this custom is called noche de novia, literally, “night of the sweetheart.”

Although prenuptial immersion in the mikveh is a universal Jewish practice, Azose says it is followed more strictly by Sephardic women—a “must,” passed from mother to daughter regardless of observance level.

A wedding day is considered a yom tov, a festive event, and the Sephardic bride and groom do not fast. They are expected to savor a meal honoring the occasion. Also, Sephardic Jews have no tradition of bedeken, or veiling of the bride.

And Sephardic Jews consider the custom of yichud—in which the couple slips away for a private moment right after the ceremony—a davar mechuar, a “repugnant thing,” in that it compromises modesty.

Among Sephardic Jews the ketubah (marriage contract) is a binding contract: The two families negotiate a sum to be paid in the event of a divorce.

During the ceremony, the Sephardic bride does not circle her groom seven times, as is the Ashkenazic custom. The Sephardic couple generally faces the audience with a tallit draped over their heads, and the officiating rabbi has his back to the guests.

The Sephardic groom’s aufruf is held on the Shabbat following the wedding rather than the one preceding it. Called an Avram Siz, this rite demands the reading of a passage in Genesis in which Abraham sends his servant, Eliezer, to find a suitable mate for his son, Isaac. The name Avram Siz is Aramaic for “Avram was old,” the words that introduce this passage, which is read in Aramaic.

At the Sephardic weeklong celebratory feasts called Shevah Brachot, guests arrive at the couple’s new home bearing food and drink. The bride and groom are treated as a king and queen; seven wedding blessings are recited over them, and their home is likened to a royal court.

Although these customs have been practiced in one manner or another for centuries, in many parts of the world they face the threat of extinction. Of the United States’ estimated 6 million Jews, only about 10 percent claim Sephardic origin.

“There’s no question that the loss of Sephardic traditions is a tragedy,” said Azose. “The symbolism behind Sephardic rituals has much significance. We who see the beauty behind it also see the loss, and our only hope is to revive it.”


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Jewish Event Planning Tip – Hiring A Professional Event Planner

Jewish Event Planning Tip – Hiring A Professional Event Planner

Jewish Event Planning

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Hiring a Professional Event Planer: The Benefits

(Reposted from http://www.JewishCelebrations.com)

Despite automation and technology, our days seem shorter than ever. Between work, school, family obligations, and social activity, the hours fly by. Are we going to find time to coordinate our wedding? Our son or daughters bar or bat mitzvah?

Well – help is here in the form of event planners. Professionals who do what they do best to make your celebration the most wonderful, memorable and as stress-free as possible.

What are the benefits to hiring a party planner professional?

Time, time, time… just think of the hours you WILL NOT have to invest in coordinating your affair. Not only will you save precious time by letting experts do your leg work, but good party planners are already knowledgeable about the best services out there. All you have to to is show up for appointments, approve designs, locations, menus, etc.
• Experienced and competent professionals have a portfolio of vendors that they have worked with in the past, and know to be competent and reliable.
• Party coordinators often get better rates, as they are in a stronger position to negotiate price.
• When you find the coordinator that is to your liking, you will find that he or she serves not only in contracting, overseeing, and coordinating your affair, but comes up with creative ideas to enhance yours.
NUMBER ONE BENEFIT — reduce your STRESS!

Practical Advice – Questions You Want Answered – Check Lis
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When hiring an Event Planner – you will be asked many questions about your preferences, budget, expectations, etc. But please remember, you are hiring and thus, you have the privilege and the obligation to determine whether the Event Planner is the right match for you. Be sure to consider the following:

• Are you and your planner on the same “wave length?” If you feel pushed, or coerced – this union is not for you.
• Make sure your coordinator understands your budget and sticks with it.
• Verify the Event Planners experience, contacts in the industry, negotiating power, ability understand contracts (so you are protected from hidden charges, or in case of default).
• Determine the extent of involvement of the Event Planner: In addition to basic coordination of location, catering, photography, music, which other services are included. i.e. – invitations, wedding attire, hands-on coordination at the event, thank you notes, honeymoon plans, etc. To avoid misunderstanding, your contract should DETAIL the services are included
• Discuss compensation in detail, and verify if there any hidden or extra charges, such as travel expenses, telephone, etc.
• Have everything documented in WRITING.
• REVIEW THE CANCELLATION POLICY

Henry Isaacs

www.henry-isaacs.com

We’d Love To Plan The Bris (Circumcision) For Natalie Portman’s Baby Boy!

We’d Love To Plan The Bris (Circumcision) For Natalie Portman’s Baby Boy!

High Style Events | Stylish Event Planners for the Jewish Event

P. 201.357.2622 | E. Events@HighStyleEvents.com | www.HighStyleEvents.com

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