Jewish Marketing 101 – American Express Small Business Forum – 6 Tasks You Could Be Outsourcing

Jewish Marketing 101 – American Express Small Business Forum – 6 Tasks You Could Be Outsourcing

6 Business Task You Could Be Outsourcing

 

 

 

6 Business Tasks You Could Be Outsourcing

Royale Scuderi Freelance Writer and Life Fulfillment Expert

April 3, 2012

Some businesses can handle normal daily activities but need outside help to take on new projects that don’t justify another employee. Other businesses are just struggling to manage day-to-day business. Still others are seeking ways to get more done or cut expenses in this challenging economy.

There are many valid reasons to consider outsourcing, but here are some of the most compelling.

  • Focus on core business activities. For many businesses, the primary motivation to outsource is that it frees owners, managers and employees to spend their time on income generating activities.
  • Improve opportunities for growth. Frequently opportunities for company growth and a desire to expand business operations exist, but resources to make it happen are lacking.
  • Increase efficiency and effectiveness. In many cases, outsourcing allows access to expert talent. Outsource service firms can offer innovative approaches, the latest technology, and creative, cutting-edge solutions that otherwise aren’t available.
  • Improve your bottom line by decreasing your expenses. A skilled contractor or firm can generally perform work less expensively than a full-time employee can, and the costs of hiring, training, and maintaining employees are eliminated, as are taxes and benefits.

Here’s what you can, and should, be outsourcing.

1. Administrative tasks. Scheduling, travel arrangements, data entry, typing and other administrative tasks can usually be handled by a virtual assistant or administrative service. While these tasks are crucial to the proper functioning of any business, they are not usually core business activities.

Where to find help: Assistant MatchAssistU and IVAA help match businesses with screened administrative service providers and offer directories of professionally trained virtual assistants.

2. Lead generation and customer service. Sales calls are often a matter of numbers; more calls equal more sales and leads. Once the initial outreach has been made, closing the sale can be handled by the internal sales force. A talented salesperson’s skills can be better utilized to close sales and handle clients, rather than make cold calls. It can also be a great deal more efficient to outsource customer support than it is to maintain a qualified support staff, especially for product-based companies.

Where to find help: Global Response and The Connection are recognized sales and customer service providers to many of the world’s top brands. Resource Nation allows companies to get quotes from pre-screened business solution sources.

3. Accounting and financial duties. Accounting firms or individuals can help with many financial services including bookkeeping, invoicing and accounts payable and receivable, as well as financial reporting, analysis and planning. Outsourcing payroll processing alone can save considerable hours, headaches and dollars. Many financial contractors will bundle these tasks for even greater savings.

Where to find help: BookkeepingHelp is a popular source of experienced financial professionals. This is one area to be very careful when outsourcing. It’s a good idea to check with certifying organizations, such as the American Institute of CPAs or American Institute of Professional Bookkeepers.

4. Marketing. Effective marketing determines how both brand and company reputation are perceived in the marketplace. A marketing firm or consultant can often provide an outside perspective that an internal marketing staff cannot. Professional freelance writers can develop higher-quality, polished content that will improve marketing efforts. Website design, brand development, press releases and online marketing duties such as social media, blogging and search engine optimization are good candidates for outsourcing as well.

Where to find help: Guru and Elance are two of the best-known sources of freelance contractors. They cover many areas of outsourcing, but excel in the areas of writing and design.

5. IT operations. It can be extremely expensive to handle IT operations in-house. The average business has limited ability and knowledge to manage all of its IT needs. Unless you’re an IT company, IT is a maintenance and repair function, not a core business activity. The potential advantages of outsourcing IT tasks are enormous.

Where to find help: CrossLoop and Tech Guru both offer access to full spectrum of IT remote services.

6. Human resources. Employee acquisition and human resource functions can easily be administered by an outside agency. Outside firms are more skilled at advertising, screening suitable applicants and checking references. Using an HR or employment service to manage employee benefits can also be wise, since they must stay up to date on the latest employment laws and standards.

Where to find help: Ceridian and Trinet are both well-known HR service providers offering a wide range of resources from recruitment to payroll to benefits administration.

Final word

Often, the best way to locate high-quality outsourcing prospects is through recommendations from your professional network. A referral from someone you know and trust is a much more reliable gauge of quality and is usually based on the level of skill and not simply the cheapest cost. Professional groups or associations and LinkedIn can also be great sources.

Royale Scuderi is a freelance writer and success coach. She is the founder of Productive Life Concepts and has been featured on top rated blogs such as Stepcase Lifehack and The Huffington Post. You can also find her musings on life and business at GuardWife.com andTwitter.com/RoyaleScuderi.

Photo credit: iStockphoto


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Jewish Marketing 101 – Choosing between Print or Online Marketing to the Jewish Market

Jewish Marketing 101 – Choosing between Print or Online Marketing to the Jewish Market

Reaching the Jewish marketing in print and online

Reaching the Jewish customer used to much easier. You put an ad in the paper and usually you had success. That way of thinking has gone the way of  The New York Sun print edition – it’s become outdated, unnoticed, and simply unnecessary. But don’t think print marketing isn’t still valuable; on the contrary, for the Jewish market, print may still be the strongest option for getting Jewish clients. Here’s a marketing and Jewish market exploration into Why Print and Why Not Print?


Why Print?

The Jewish market will always have Sabbath (Shabbos/Shabbat). The fastest growing denomination of Jewry is the Orthodox market (link) and this is a market that turns off all iPads, iPhones, TV’s and computers in favor of relaxation and reading. Print advertising is the top method for reaching a market with complete attention span for a dedicated amount of time. There are currently more than three dozen print media outlets (both newspapers and pennysavers) that serve the Greater New York Jewish community, a well above average number (and overly disproportionate to the size of the New York Jewish community) and testament to the vitality of print media to the Jewish community. Furthermore, the Ultra-Orthodox market has recently protested overuse of the internet due to morality standards so print marketing is generally the best and only way to promote successfully to their market.

The original social network: Synagogue – Jews are no strangers to social networks. For thousands of years, Jewry has been a close knit, often “clique-ish” and isolated community that relied on their networks to do business, buy goods, and create opportunities – they had their own social network for generations. The synagogue is the original hub for Jewish social networking – simply look at each community’s Yahoo “shul group” membership and responses rate to see how important – and as such, anything that was discussed in person, with an offline component such as a newspaper clipping, flyer, coupon, or ad, was of great value. Although the Jewish market is constantly involved in web, digital, and mobile applications, there’s always an inherent return to the old ways of doing business by word of mouth and through Jewish social networking. Although online and social marketing is a valuable supplement, print advertising and offline marketing is one of the most basic tools that the Jewish community has always been attracted to.

Why Not Print?


We’re All Connected. Finally. – The Jewish market has never been slow to change and adapt. Facebook, Google, Twitter, and Yahoo have all been embraced for their speed, connectivity, and usefulness in connecting Jewish ideas to new Jewish markets. Although the Orthodox market is the fastest growing, the non-religious and unaffiliated Jewis market still remains the largest (Facebook and Google were both founded by Jewish but non-affiliated innovators). Since the Jewish market is extremely small, connecting to Jewish communities and people in diverse regions of the world make online marketing and presence extremely important. Measureable – Online media is much more measurable than print media and, without question, is growing faster than print marketing. In fact, print media responses requires a conscious, purposeful “next step” such as calling the number, visiting the store, arranging a consultation, etc., let alone an actual purchase. Online marketing only needs a “click” to be redirected to all the information, feedback, price, and benefits one can need before buying, which is much easier than other ways. Furthermore, not only is the chance of purchase much higher, the advertiser now has a nice amount of information on his customer and his marketing – depending on privacy settings, they know age range, geographical location, where they browsed, when and where they clicked, and how long they spent deciding on a purchase or not. Remember the line from John Wanamaker, “Half the money I spend on advertising is wasted; the trouble is I don’t know which half”? Through online marketing, you can finally see what you’re wasting.

Instant Response by Email –Be it a Groupon daily offer, breaking news e-mail, or a dedicated stand alone email blast, email marketing offers the opportunity to reach your market instantly and on your schedule. Although the Jewish market is reached no differently by email than American consumers, they do have a dedicated Jewish email marketplace (Negev Direct has a Jewish philanthropic postal mail marketplace as well). Starting with Groupon-style Jewish/Kosher daily deal options, Jdeal.com, Jewpon, Kosher Kouponz, and Yipit are some of the top Jewish daily deal sites with large email lists. Axiom33 and Sephardic Daily Blast are two dedicated email marketing options that target specific ethnic groups, such as Jewish women and Sephardic Jews respectively. And, of course, the top Jewish news outlets in the nation, such as The Jewish Week, The Daily Forward, and Jewish Journal of Los Angeles, all have dedicated email lists of their readers as well as print, web, and social media components all tied into one. There are instant ways to reach the Jewish market – choosing the right one requires an expert in the Jewish segmenting, though.

Overall, the best solution when deciding between online and offline/traditional forms of marketing to the Jewish market is to obtain an expert in the Jewish market and in marketing/social media. By navigating your choices better, you’ll see more success no matter which direction you head in!


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Jewish Marketing 101 – Marketing Outsourcing grew over 100% in 2011 (CMO Survey)

Jewish Marketing 101 – Marketing Outsourcing grew over 100% in 2011 (CMO Survey)

CMO Survey on Marketing OutsourcingReposted from CMO Survey

Outsourcing Marketing

January 24th, 2012

I asked top marketers to report how much they expected their companies to outsource marketing in the next 12 months. This percentage has grown over time as shown in Figure 1. In fact the last measurement, taken in August 2011, grew by over 100% over the prior year!

Figure 1: Percentage of Company Outsourcing of Marketing Expected in Next 12 Months

Why do companies outsource marketing?

  1. Companies don’t have the expertise to perform key marketing tasks.
  2. Companies don’t think the benefit of building knowledge and skills is better than the value they get from an expert partner performing that same task.
  3. Companies can’t produce the same function at the same low price as they can buy it in the open market because the provider has scale, scope, and experience (and perhaps cheap labor?).
  4. Companies prioritize other strategic areas more highly than doing marketing internally.
  5. Companies want a new point of view. It is easy to stop learning when you are stuck listening to the same colleagues every day. An external partner can offer important insights.
  6. Companies don’t understand the value of marketing.

What are the costs of outsourcing marketing?

  1. Integration costs: Outsourced marketing doesn’t fit well with marketing the company produces or with other strategies it is pursuing
  2. Customer costs: Managers lose sight of customers and what the firm is doing in the marketplace. They spend a lot of time on inventory, balance sheets, analyst conference calls, or building plants. This turning inward can be tragic in some cases.
  3. Control costs: Coase and Williamson both won Nobel prizes in Economics for their study of transaction costs, which are those costs the firm must control, contract, and incentivize away to ensure partners act as its agent. When a company chooses to “buy” its marketing services and not “make” them itself, the challenge is to ensure the relationship produces value.
  4. Objectivity costs: No marketer wants to be fired for sharing bad news about the value of a strategic decision or initiative. This can make it tougher to be a truth teller if you are providing marketing from outside the boundary of the firm.
  5. Risk costs: Partners may take more or less risk than a firm would take given they are not responsible to shareholders, employees, and customers in the same way managers are.
  6. Path dependence losses: A path dependence means that experience matters. The down side to path dependencies from marketing experience is that firms get locked into their own habits and routines. However, the upside of path dependency—grinding out the knowledge and efficiencies that come from learning by doing over and over and over again—is not realized either. These positive path dependencies can make it difficult for competitors to jump in because the firm is so good at what it does.

Is your firm outsourcing marketing? How is the calculus of these costs and benefits working out? Any suggestions on how to tip the scales in the favor of benefits? I’ll share more next week on who is outsourcing. In the mean time, jump in and share your view.

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Henry Isaacs | Jewish Marketing & Communications Consultants

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Jewish Marketing 101 – Why Non-Profits Should Consider Outsourcing

Jewish Marketing 101 – Why Non-Profits Should Consider Outsourcing

Jewish social media outsourcing
Reposted from Third Sector Magazine

Why Not-For Profit’s should consider outsourcing

Wed, 12 October 2011

Outsourcing is becoming increasingly popular in the not-for-profit sector as it allows associations, charities and other not-for-profit organisations to benefit from the expertise of specialists when they need them and at rates they can afford.

Outsourcing refers to contracting the skills of a company to fulfil an organisation’s needs and allows them to take advantage of experts that they do not have, or cannot afford, internally. This may include marketing, graphic design, organising conferences and events, secretariat services, publishing, marketing or finance.

Outsourcing is a cost-effective way for not-for-profit (NFP) organisations to achieve their organisation’s goals and keep within their budget.

Findings from The Outsourcing Institute’s most recent study, which surveyed 1,410 members, found that reducing and controlling costs is the most common reason organisations choose to outsource. With a limited budget NFPs often can’t afford five or more employees to fulfil their organisation’s marketing, graphic design, editorial, secretariat and event needs; and it’s difficult to find one person with skills in all of these areas. However, outsourcing allows NFPs to draw on the skills of specialist departments with differing areas of expertise for often less than the cost of hiring one internal employee. Depending on a NFPs needs outsourcing can be the equivalent of employing ten specialists for less than the price of one.

Not only is outsourcing more cost effective than hiring staff internally, it can also result in a great level of efficiency. With access to teams of experts in a range of fields, organisations can enjoy a more professional standard of work, which can improve efficiency, the image and reputation of the organisation, and increase member/donor support.

CEO of The Institute of Hospital Engineers Australia Greg Bondar outsources their member magazine to Third Sector Services. He says “I am of the view that specialisation is the key to productivity and effective cost management, hence why do what others do better?”

The Australian Counselling Association (ACA) CEO Philip Armstrong also outsources their magazine to Third Sector Services and says “The journal in its ten year history had reached its optimum in relation to delivering a peer reviewed journal to members that was produced internally by the association. To go to the next level and compete internationally in design, content and layout with other similar journals it needed the expertise of professional publishers as this was not and is not the expected strength of ACA. Therefore an external publisher was sought to take the journal to the next level.”

The Outsourcing Institute’s research shows that the second most common reason organisations outsource is that it allows them to focus on their key objectives, which can increase their effectiveness and improve member/donor satisfaction.

Outsourcing allows an organisation to focus on what is most important to the running of their association, society, institute or charity – whether it is advocacy, governance, pleasing members or fundraising.

Additionally, outsourcing allows NFPs flexibility which is not achievable when hiring someone internally. Outsourcing allows organisations to access professionals when and only for as long as an organisation needs them.

“Without sounding gratuitous, the services provided Third Sector Services are both professional and friendly, and very flexible,” admits Bondar.

By decreasing costs, improving the quality of an organisation’s offerings and allowing NFPs to focus on their core objectives, outsourcing is expected to continue to rise in popularity as the smarter choice for NFPs.


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Insourcing – Keeping “outsourced” tasks in America

Insourcing – Keeping “outsourced” tasks in America

Reposted from The Press Enterprise

‘Insourcing’ outsourcing to other American firms a benefit

Sarah Cullins

04:03 PM PDT on Saturday, August 20, 2011

Outsourcing has become a dirty word in the American labor market, because it brings to mind the image of employers sending jobs overseas to countries where they can pay workers less than a dollar an hour.

Many companies have realized that outsourcing comes with its own set of problems, as customers complain when they have trouble understanding customer service reps based in other parts of the world. Outsourcing also can cause quality control or supply line issues, as seen in the recent Japanese earthquake.

However, many American companies have opted to outsource some of their in-house services to American contractors. This has been termed “insourcing.”

The work is contracted out of the company, but remains with American businesses. Companies often decide to insource auxiliary work, such as accounting, public relations and IT, which are important, but not central to the company’s mission.

Here are some of the reasons why companies opt to do this:

It’s cheaper. If you have to pay an in-house HR or IT person, it will probably cost you at least $3,000 a month in wages. When you add on benefits, you are looking at a total cost of more than $4,000 per month. For many companies it easier to pay an outside company $2,000 for the same services. Employers also know there is no way they can find a top-level employee for $2,000 per month.

It’s more efficient. When you insource some of your duties, you send the work to a person who is not going to get caught up in office politics or water cooler chat. Most contractors realize that if they don’t perform, they don’t get paid. This ensures that the work will be done right and done on time. Insourcing also allows you to hire experienced people who have the skills to complete projects faster.

Insourced workers can also adapt to change faster. One of the biggest complaints about working in a large organization is trying to implement a new procedure. The decision has to be kicked up several layers of management, and it can take months for it to be approved. With a contract employee, the decision can be made fairly quickly since they do not have to go through as many layers.

It allows you to focus on what you are really good at. If you make tires, you want to focus on making tires and not have to worry about accounting, HR or public relations. A large company has divisions to focus on these areas. But in small companies it is the owner that has to handle all of these duties. Of course, while he is doing this, he does not have time to focus on his actual business. Insourcing this kind of work to contractors frees up the owner’s time and allows him to concentrate on actually running his business.

From the points I have listed, it is easy to see why more and more American companies are moving to towards insourcing work, as a way of staying leaner and meaner. In today’s market companies are constantly looking for ways to shave fat off the bottom line, and increasingly that means sending work to local contractors who save time and money.

Sarah Cullins is president of Finesse Staffing in Rancho Cucamonga. Reach her via 909-466-9933 or scullins@finessestaffing.com.

Henry Isaacs

http://www.Henry-Isaacs.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jewish Marketing 101 – Harvard Business Review on Outsourcing your Marketing

Jewish Marketing 101 – Harvard Business Review on Outsourcing your Marketing

 

Harvard Business Review Outsourcing

Here’s a highly informative Q and A from Harvard Business Review on the pro’s and con’s on outsourcing your marketing…

Should You Outsource Your Marketing?

Most companies already outsource a portion of their marketing function—advertising. But what about direct-mail management, lead management, or customer analytics? Increasingly, expertise in these and other marketing areas lies outside your own walls. And that is why more and more companies are turning to marketing partners.

Harvard Business School professors Gail J. McGovern and John Quelch documented the trend in an article in the March issue of Harvard Business Review. One reason behind the move? While company marketing departments have plenty of talented right-brain, creative types, they may lack the left-brain analytics needed to better understand their customers in today’s information-rich environment.

Besides, argue McGovern and Quelch, outsourcing marketing can lead to better quality and lower costs.

McGovern offers a unique perspective: Before joining the HBS faculty in 2002, she was president of the Fidelity Personal Investments unit of Fidelity Investments, serving 4 million customers with $500 billion in assets.

She answers our questions in this e-mail Q&A.

Poping Lin: We are familiar with the benefits of outsourcing various corporate functions, but the idea of outsourcing marketing, at least beyond advertising, seems relatively new. Can you discuss this concept and the potential benefits to businesses?

Gail J. McGovern: The outsourcing of marketing activities is catching on; in fact, in a recent poll of marketing executives, 53 percent reported plans to outsource most of their marketing activities.

The benefits to business include cost savings and improved quality. Additionally, many firms lack “left-brain” analytical skills in-house, even though those skills are becoming more important than ever in an age of one-to-one marketing, and find that outside expertise is often needed. Sony, a legendary marketer, outsourced its program to market products through its online “Sony Style” store, recognizing that they needed expertise in areas such as customer database construction.

With media fragmentation, such decisions will become far more common, because companies can no longer rely on mass marketing to reach prospective customers. Communication tasks have become much more complicated, and therefore more dependent on computer-aided analysis.

Q: What marketing functions should and should not be outsourced?

A: Companies stand to benefit considerably by outsourcing, for example, analytical functions to qualified suppliers if those skills are lacking in-house. But some aspects of marketing are less amenable to outsourcing—those that directly drive marketing strategy.

While computers are important, the CEO and top managers still need to meet regularly with customers. Companies need chief marketing officers to drive marketing strategy and make the most of the company’s customer relationships. And companies still need flesh-and-blood employees to win and service major accounts.

Q: What is the role of the head marketing executive who oversees an outsourcing program in his or her department?

A: The skills required of the marketing manager are rapidly changing. Today, managers are like ringmasters in a circus; they must understand how to access the skills they need, since in practice they are relying on a variety of in-house and outside suppliers to get the job done.

Q: What are the keys to consider in successfully managing outsourcing relationships?

A: Marketing managers need to nurture ongoing relationships with outside suppliers. The best outsourcing arrangements are partnerships. Suppliers should not be regarded as mere contractors, since contractors do not always perceive a long-term stake in the project’s success.

The value created should be seen as shared value. Managing suppliers in this way requires a great deal of skill and competencies that are not always resident within a firm. This challenge requires negotiation and communications skills as well as a strong ability to project manage several elements of various marketing campaigns.

Q: Is there a tie between outsourcing marketing and the increased global outsourcing we see in other functions? Will offshore marketing be next?

A: There are some strong connections. Motivation, for one. Companies in general turn to outsourcing as a means of saving money while accessing the skills they need, whether it’s marketing or IT services.

As companies have become more comfortable and familiar with outsourcing arrangements, they’ve become willing to trust outside suppliers with business functions that, until recently, have not been outsourced.

Q: What are you working on now?

A: I am exploring board governance issues, specifically the role that boards should play in ensuring the effectiveness and efficiency of the marketing function in a firm.

About the author

Poping Lin is a business information librarian at Baker Library, Harvard Business School, with a specialty in marketing.

Copyright © 2011 President and Fellows of Harvard College

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Henry Isaacs | Jewish Marketing & Communications Consultants

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Jewish Event Planning 101 – Why You Should Outsource Your Event Planning

Jewish Event Planning 101 – Why You Should Outsource Your Event Planning

Here’s an overview of the benefits of outsourcing your event planning to the experts. We know that outsourcing sounds evil and un-American, but that’s not what outsourcing entirely means.

Outsourcing is very misunderstood.

Some interpret outsourcing as costing American’s jobs by sending them overseas. Others consider outsourcing as a cheap way to get things done. In reality, outsourcing is simply defined as creating efficiencies in the workplace by letting outside specialists handle tasks within their field of expertise. Outsourcing itself is nothing new. Firms have long hired outside vendors to handle marketing, advertising, public relations, media buying, event planning, web design, printing, and many other services that are deemed by companies as “necessary functions best left to experts”.

Outsourcing creates an efficient team of expert planners.

That’s what outsourcing your event planning does: creates an efficient team of expert event planners or your events, removing workplace inefficiencies such as time, expense, and uncertainty of creating, planning, maintaining relationships, and coordinating events.

Benefits of Outsourcing Your Event Planning

 

  • Experts in Event Planning…

Every firm aims to hire the best employees with the most expertise. Unfortunately, when it comes to event planning, that doesn’t always happen. Most firms rely on interns, temps, inexperienced employees in different departments, or part-time receptionists to plan their events. That method of operating is similar to sending a novice to close an important sales deal. From a time management point of view, researching and qualifying catering, venues, entertainment, and other event services are time-consuming and ancillary tasks that cut into a person’s everyday workload. As a result, the  “non event planning” employee may settle for a simple solution and a simple event just to get the task out of the way. That leaves your firm with a mediocre event with potentially low attendance, unqualified attendee’s, and ineffective results

  • … Create Memorable & Successful Events.

Effective and efficient firms send their best to close the deal, and for your events, with dozens or hundreds of prospective clients and deals possible, why use a under qualified team to create a mediocre event? Organizations need to have memorable, outstanding, and inspiring events for their current and prospective donors to attend and those donors need to see that the organization has efficient leadership and that their dollars are being  put to good use. Mediocre events don’t create valuable memories of the product or service; bland fundraising events don’t inspire confidence in the organization. By outsourcing to expert event planners, your firm has access to an expanded talent pool with innovative ideas and fresh perspectives all at greater cost savings. Event planning experts make sure the events they plan are outstanding, memorable, and inspiring. And if you’re looking to make an impact and leave attendee’s wanting more, your firm should defer to the experts.

  • Saves costs (making your dollars go further).

Saving money while trying to make your dollars go further is a task on every firm’s mind. In tough economies, firms need to do more with less. Budgets for marketing, event planning, and public relations can be very tight, especially during a slow economic recovery. Yet smart companies and organizations understand that when times are tough, marketing, PR and event planning are more important than ever and extremely vital to their growth and mission. By outsourcing those tasks, your firm is able to work within your budgetary framework, reduces overhead and operating costs (such as office space and employee benefits), and increases worker efficiency by allowing them to focus on more important and concentrated tasks.

  • Greater employee efficiency. Less “filler work”.

When not planning events, employers have a tendency to fill event planners daily workload with “filler work”. Faxing, copying, answering phones, monitoring your social media, etc … Honestly, these are tasks that can be done by an hourly intern instead of a salaried employee with benefits. Not only is “filler work” tedious, belaboring, and uninspiring for event planners, your company risks creating negative workplace morale and diluted employee job satisfaction. Which means that before long, you’re event planners could bail for more growth-oriented positions. If an event planner was hired to plan events, then that employee wants to do just that and play to his strengths and core competencies. If your firm isn’t having enough events to justify a full time event planner or filling an event planners time with “filler work”, its time to consider outsourcing your event planning tasks.

  • Negotiate better pricing through strong relationships.

A major detail in the event planning process is obtaining the best selection of services at the best price. Within organizations and businesses, management that constantly shops for a “best-price” deal in their event planning is usually unable to capitalize on the capabilities or selection that knowledgeable event planners can offer. As time goes on, firms sense of urgency in their event planning could mean closing on the first available vendor, not utilizing the advantages of negotiating pricing and services. Experienced event planners have extensive vendor databases, established relationships, and a distinct advantage in obtaining the best service at the best price.

Work with experts. Save money.

Increase efficiency. Obtain better pricing.

Outsourcing is starting to make a lot of sense.

Henry Isaacs

www.Henry-Isaacs.com

Jewish Advertising 101 – Print Is Alive and Well By The Jewish Audience

Jewish Advertising 101 – Print Is Alive and Well By The Jewish Audience

Reaching the Jewish marketing in print and onlinePrint marketing has certainly gotten a bad rep in the eyes of advertisers and media buyers. With news and information moving at the speed of light, waiting for a print publication can seem a bit outdated and slow for advertisers seeking instant and quantifiable results.

But for the Jewish market, print newspapers and media outlets are thriving due primarily to the weekend Sabbath (as noted in The Jewish Week article). For Orthodox Jewry, the Sabbath has certain restrictions regarding computer, television, and internet use, leaving print as the traditional source of information and roundup of Jewish news.

In certain ultra-Orthodox sects of Jewry, print is even the sole source of information of news, business, and advertising, due to even stricter sect restrictions on internet, telivision, and computer usage. Though not too common a restriction outside of certain communities (such as Williamsburg, Boro Park, and parts of Rockland County), print publications are still a vibrant source of advertising and marketing. With Jewish families tending to be larger than the average US family size, the Jewish market is growing faster than the average US consumer, especially in the Greater New York area.

Within the Greater New York market, pockets of Jewish consumers in Orthodox communities hold great purchasing power. Flatbush, Teaneck, Five Towns, Boro Park, Monsey, and Great Neck hold affluent Jewish markets that utilize their weekly print publications for purchasing decisions. In fact, these communities tend to have numerous print publications to service these communities. Flatbush alone has nearly a dozen print newspapers, media outlets, penny savers, and magazines servicing their community. 

In modern and non-Orthodox communities that don’t strictly adhere to internet, television, and computer restrictions on Sabbath, print is still a traditional media outlet that helps them connect to the weekly holiday. And as such, certain print media outlets cater to the market as intensely as the Orthodox print publications. And of course, many print media outlets have supplemental web and email services, as well as innovative approaches with Jewish wire services, that provide breaking news and weekly roundups of Jewish international news.

The main issue for Jewish advertisers and mainstream advertisers looking to  looking to target the Jewish consumer is knowing how to sort out the print publications for quality, subscribers, and demographics. Within the New York area, print is definitely the primary way to reach the Jewish consumer.

 

Henry Isaacs | Jewish Marketing & Communications Consultants

 

 

P. 201.357.2622  |  E. Info@Henry-Isaacs.com  | www.Henry-Isaacs.com

 

 

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Jewish Event Tip – The One Thing NOT To Skimp On

Jewish Event Tip – The One Thing NOT To Skimp On

Jewish Event Planning & Kosher CateringThe Jewish event can be an extremely lavish one or a cost effective basic one. Depending on the event, the location, the geographical region, or the target audience, the Jewish event ranges from a Bar/Bat Mitzvah featuring the Black Eyed Peas to a small Synagogue dinner for congregants. Most of us will probably deal with events basically in between those types – mainly average sized weddings and Bar/Bat Mitzvahs, organizational fundraisers, and even School Journal dinners.

But there’s one commonality in every type of Jewish event that determines the success and “must return” factor for the people attending (by success, I’m referring to whether or not people spread the word positively or negatively). And its the one thing never to skimp on. It’s the food. From the hor dourves to the dessert. Above all, the food is the main thing that will be discussed, critiqued, praised, and remembered at any Jewish event.

And in some cases, the food goes beyond just taste and abundance. Food becomes a social requirement. For certain social events, the Jewish market will go to many lengths to ensure Jewish foods, such as Israeli, Bukharian, Persian, Moroccan, etc, are able to be provided by their Kosher caterers. Once a Jewish ethnic group finds a caterer that provides their brand of food and great quality, they stick with it for ALL their special events. For organizational functions, having glatt kosher food, as opposed to simply kosher, attract a different crowd of people and thus a different type of donor.

Let’s face it – the Jewish demographic loves to have great Kosher food. We think the food fascination comes from a tradition rich in long holiday seasons, lifecycle celebrations that closely mingle joy and food, and even the Jewish family’s revolvement around the kosher kitchen. So certainly for the Jewish market’s special events they attend, after inquiring about the type of event, their second question is “So what’d they have?” The food is the main focus for the Jewish event. The venue could be glorious, the flowers magnificent, the orchestra toe-tappingly good; if the food isn’t up to the standards they’re anticipating, you’re event may not get the high marks you’re aiming for.

Now, for the occasional wedding, social event and one-shot event, that desirable word of mouth and buzz factor may not really matter, but for the organizational, non-profit, or corporate event that happens year after year, word of mouth/buzz is a driving force behind increased fundraising, attendance, sales and return customers. As frequent travelers can attest, free breakfasts at hotels is a great draw to get new reservations, but the quality of the food at these hotels has to be top notch for repeat business. Same for the Jewish event. The food doesn’t need to be innovative nor particularly creative – the food simply needs to be great and available in relative abundance. With this in mind, the one place you may be able to cut corners could be dessert, but ONLY because the rest of the meal was fantastic.

Overall, when planning an event, the food will make the difference between a good event and a great memorable event!


High Style EventsStylish Event Planners for the Jewish Event

P. 646.833.8604  |  E. Events@HighStyleEvents.com
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Weddings | Bar/Bat Mitzvahs | Social Events | Non-Profit | Corporate

The brains behind this blog.

The brains behind this blog.

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