Jewish Social Media 101 – To Hire or To Outsource Jewish Social Media? You Decide!

Jewish Social Media 101 – To Hire or To Outsource Jewish Social Media? You Decide!

Social Media - In House or Outsource?Hiring a full time Social Media Strategist, though highly important in the new age of digital PR & fundraising, can be very expensive for the budget strapped non-profit or school. As shown below, you have to budget in between $46,000 to $71,000 for a Social Media Specialist alone (benefits not included). For Jewish companies, you also have to factor in health insurance, benefits, and the intangible “Jewish cost-of-living”, as well as the risk of high turnover due to the strong demand for Jewish social media employees. Plus, the ROI from social media is still tough to determine – is it how many “Likes” you get, or maybe the amount of “Tweets”? And how do you tie it back to sales? (this ALSO doesn’t take into account that your employees will end up being on Facebook all day. Not much work ethic there.)

Bear in mind also that many Jewish non-profits and schools are still focused on traditional methods of Jewish marketing & communications. Which is why advertising in Jewish print media has continued to remain stable while digital & social marketing lags behind. The extent of Jewish social media is the community shul listserve, such as Yahoo Groups or Google Groups, which is a textual Craigslist type of community bulletin board. Jewish social media groups have attempted to pop up though most are merely groups within Facebook & Linkedin. As a result, social media as a career hasn’t taken off in the Jewish marketplace, except as a freelance option.

Overall, the smarter choice is to outsource your Jewish social media (social media outsourcing rose 128% last year) to freelance experts who don’t require full-time employment but can do the job equally well. Using the outline of salaries and need for social media strategy, you can judge your need and decide what tasks you can outsource and what tasks to keep in house. Reposted from Onward Search, a Social Media Recruiting Firm.

http://www.onwardsearch.com/Social-Media-Salaries/


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Top 10 Jewish Apps for Iphone

Top 10 Jewish Apps for Iphone

Jewish iPhone and Android appsIs your Yiddish rusty? Want to whip up a kosher culinary masterpiece? Trying to remember which prayer to say as you cast off your sins on Rosh Hashanah? Don’t worry—there’s an app for it!


Oy!

Ever wonder when it’s okay to toss out an “oy”? The opportunities, it seems, are endless. The Oy! app for iPhones and iPads provides five recorded variations on the go-to favorite for moments when no other expression of dismay will work. Does the situation call for a full-blown “oy gevalt”? Done. Need a classic “oy vey”? No problem. The app even covers that perennial favorite, “oy yoy yoy.”

Jewish Mother

The makers of Jewish Mother have remedied the logistical difficulties of constant maternal accomp-animent: In lieu of an actual mother, a virtual version programmed with more than 100 phrases follows users. “Happy Hanukkah, bubbeleh,” she might say. “Of course, I’d be happier if you had kids.” The digi-mom even spouts out different phrases based on gender and marital status.

Gematria Calculator

Gematria, part of Kabbalistic thought, assigns a numerical value to each of the Hebrew alphabet’s 22 letters, used to decode deeper meanings in Hebrew words and phrases. For those unable to perform such complex calculations in their heads, the Gematria Calculator determines the numerical values of phrases in Jewish texts, making the trajectory to spiritual reward a little less mathematically onerous.

Jewish Temple Jigsaw

Re-jigger this app’s puzzle pieces to form the Holy Temple, known in Hebrew as Beit HaMikdash. Those who solve the puzzle are rewarded—the screen flashes: “You built a Beis Hamikdash!” Not even King David could say that.

iTashlich

Tashlich, the Rosh Hashanah ceremony in which pieces of bread symbolizing sins are cast into a body of running water, has gone high-tech. This handy app explains the ritual and provides audio of the main prayer in both English and Hebrew, as well as the Hebrew text of the three primary blessings. It also prompts reflection on possible modern sins, such as, “Have you used other people’s unsecured wireless Internet?”

Jew Booth

Sure, that photo of you at cousin Jake’s wedding looks nice, but does it need a little Jewish je ne sais quoi? Jew Booth is here to help. Take any photo and make it distinctly Jewish by adding a kippah, a Star of David necklace or other Jewish accoutrements. Your Facebook friends will think you’ve undergone a religious transformation when they see photos of you wearing a black fedora; whether or not you clue them in to Jew Booth’s photographic trickery is up to you.

Yiddish Slang Dictionary

The next time you’re at a party and someone calls you a shlemiel when you spill your soda, whip out the Yiddish Slang Dictionary on your smartphone for an appropriate retort. Thanks to this app, Yiddish experts and neophytes alike can parse the language’s rich rhetorical epithets. The dictionary includes common words (schlep, mensch) along with more obscure bon mots such as tummler and schmutter.

The Amazing Jewish-Fact-a-Day Calendar

Can you name the play into which Shakespeare slipped some Hebrew? What do you know about the Talmud’s seemingly prophetic stance on airplanes? This app winforms users about important historical events that occurred on that date, fascinating religious practices and famous figures. Learn about everything from Louis Armstrong’s early job working for a Jewish family to historic disagreements between Hillel and Shammai.

Going Paprikash

Before World War II, as many as 250,000 Jews lived in Budapest, filling the Hungarian capital’s 125 synagogues. When they weren’t praying, they were cooking up a treasure trove of culinary treats, such as rakott krumpli (potato casserole), paprikas csirke (chicken paprikas) and gomboc (dumplings). Those longing for a taste of Hungary’s Jewish heritage can download this app, which features 120 kosher Hungarian recipes and the tales of how they came to be.

Judoku

Thumb-twiddlers on subways and in office meetings can now brush up on their Jewish symbols while passing the time: A new version of the popular logic game Sudoku, usually played with numbers, features images such as the shofar, the Star of David and Hebrew letters. Just make sure to follow the cardinal rule of the game: no more than one menorah in each three-by-three box.


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Insourcing – Keeping “outsourced” tasks in America

Insourcing – Keeping “outsourced” tasks in America

Reposted from The Press Enterprise

‘Insourcing’ outsourcing to other American firms a benefit

Sarah Cullins

04:03 PM PDT on Saturday, August 20, 2011

Outsourcing has become a dirty word in the American labor market, because it brings to mind the image of employers sending jobs overseas to countries where they can pay workers less than a dollar an hour.

Many companies have realized that outsourcing comes with its own set of problems, as customers complain when they have trouble understanding customer service reps based in other parts of the world. Outsourcing also can cause quality control or supply line issues, as seen in the recent Japanese earthquake.

However, many American companies have opted to outsource some of their in-house services to American contractors. This has been termed “insourcing.”

The work is contracted out of the company, but remains with American businesses. Companies often decide to insource auxiliary work, such as accounting, public relations and IT, which are important, but not central to the company’s mission.

Here are some of the reasons why companies opt to do this:

It’s cheaper. If you have to pay an in-house HR or IT person, it will probably cost you at least $3,000 a month in wages. When you add on benefits, you are looking at a total cost of more than $4,000 per month. For many companies it easier to pay an outside company $2,000 for the same services. Employers also know there is no way they can find a top-level employee for $2,000 per month.

It’s more efficient. When you insource some of your duties, you send the work to a person who is not going to get caught up in office politics or water cooler chat. Most contractors realize that if they don’t perform, they don’t get paid. This ensures that the work will be done right and done on time. Insourcing also allows you to hire experienced people who have the skills to complete projects faster.

Insourced workers can also adapt to change faster. One of the biggest complaints about working in a large organization is trying to implement a new procedure. The decision has to be kicked up several layers of management, and it can take months for it to be approved. With a contract employee, the decision can be made fairly quickly since they do not have to go through as many layers.

It allows you to focus on what you are really good at. If you make tires, you want to focus on making tires and not have to worry about accounting, HR or public relations. A large company has divisions to focus on these areas. But in small companies it is the owner that has to handle all of these duties. Of course, while he is doing this, he does not have time to focus on his actual business. Insourcing this kind of work to contractors frees up the owner’s time and allows him to concentrate on actually running his business.

From the points I have listed, it is easy to see why more and more American companies are moving to towards insourcing work, as a way of staying leaner and meaner. In today’s market companies are constantly looking for ways to shave fat off the bottom line, and increasingly that means sending work to local contractors who save time and money.

Sarah Cullins is president of Finesse Staffing in Rancho Cucamonga. Reach her via 909-466-9933 or scullins@finessestaffing.com.

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